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Series
Contemporary Revolution in Latin America
Episode Number
No. 1
Episode
The Revolution of Rising Expectations
Producing Organization
National Association of Broadcasters
National Educational Television and Radio Center
University of Florida. Radio Center
University of Florida. School of Inter-American Studies
University of Florida. School of Journalism and Communication
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip-500-s17ss81m
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Description
This episode begins with an introduction of a few sound clips from professors and politicians touching on the hopes, problems, and desires of the people of Latin America. This leads into Canham talking about the education and survival rate of children in Guatemala. We are introduced to a speech by Jose Figueras, former President of Costa Rica, that talks about the United States overlooking Latin America and the need for reform. Clarence Senior, a Columbia University Sociologist, explains the nature of this contemporary revolution by talking about the rising expectations of people across the world and how the Latin American people want to solve their problems. Adding to this, we hear from Anita Brenner, editor of Mexico This Month, who talks about the Mexican Revolution and its lasting effects. The next part talks about the conditions that influence these people and how ideas spread. We hear from Dr. Orlando Fals Borda, a Colombian Sociologist at the National University of Bogota, about the revolution of communication and transportation and its effects. This leads to the topic of land reform in which we hear a clip from Oswaldo Lima, leader of the Brazilian Labor Party, about land ownership. Canham then explains the terms of latifundia and the Hacienda system. Economics becomes the topic as we hear from Argentine professor of economics at the University of Mississippi, Pedro Teichert, who talks about land reform and social structures and their effects on industrial progress. Canham explains this as a problem with education. We then hear from Luther Evans, former director general of UNESCO, who explains the education levels of Latin America overall. Canham talks about literacy rates where we here from Antonio Collado, a Brazilian journalist and encyclopedia editor, and his hopes that the Brazilian government makes an emphasis on education and literacy. Canham then begins to talk about the interrelation of the problems that Latin Americans face which, leads us to hearing from political scientist Harry Cantor of the University of Florida. Cantor talks about the economy of Latin America and its effects. Canham talks about communists taking advantage and the appeal of communism. We then hear from the Latin American specialist on the editorial board of The New York Times, Herbert L. Matthews. Matthews goes further into explaining the appeals of communism on varying levels. Canham talks about Latin American resentment of United States policies since World War II. We hear from an unidentified Peruvian student who attended the University of Florida. This student talks about the advertising of freedom and democracy and how it is now time for action. This leads to Canham introducing a clip from senator at the time, John F. Kennedy. The clip is of Kennedy introducing the Alliance for Progress. We then hear clip a of Jose Figueras speaking at the University of Florida, before the announcement of the Alliance for Progress was made, about the need of great efforts by the United States leadership and the possibility of loss of Latin America in the Cold War. We then hear from a former Guatemalan ambassador, Jorge Garcia Granados, who has a less pessimistic view. Canham introduces a clip of the President of Colombia, Alberto Lleras Camargo, who holds a more urgent view. The last part of this episode is a panel of graduate faculty at the University of Florida School of Inter-American Studies who is introduced by the school's director, Dr. A. Curtis Wilgus. Wilgus gives a brief introduction talking about the current problems being inherited from the past and how the national economy of these areas had failed the people. He then introduces professor of Latin American Economics Robert W. Bradberry and visiting professor of Latin American Sociology Larry Nelson. Bradberry talks about his thoughts on Latin American problems, its growth, and its need to increase production. Nelson then talks about what he thinks is the most important problem in Latin America. He talks about class systems and racial composition. Canham concludes the panel explaining that Latin America is looking to the United States and Russia as examples which, leads to a conflict of ideology for Latin America. Key figures in this episode: Jose Figueras, former president of Costa Rica; Clarence Senior, Latin American specialist Columbia University Sociologist; Anita Brenner, editor of Mexico This Month; Dr. Orlando Fals Borda, Colombian sociologist at the National University of Bogota; Oswaldo Lima, leader of the Brazilian Labor Party; Dr. Pedro Teichert, Argentine professor of economic at the University of Mississippi; Luther Evans, former director general of UNESCO; Antonio Collado, Brazilian journalist and encyclopedia editor; Harry Cantor, University of Florida political scientist; Herbert L. Matthews, Latin American specialist on the editorial board of The New York Times; John F. Kennedy, former U.S. Senator and U.S. President; Jorge Garcia Granados, former Guatemalan ambassador to the United Nations; Alberto Lleras Camargo, President of Colombia; Dr. A. Curtis Wilgus, University of Florida School of Inter-American Studies director; Dr. Robert W. Bradberry, professor of Latin American Economics; Dr. Larry Nelson, professor of Latin American Sociology.
"Narrated by Erwin D. Canham, editor of The Christian Science Monitor, these 11 half-hour radio documentaries are designed to increase United States public understanding of Latin America. "The series reports on the great social, political and economic changes taking place in the 20 countries of Latin America."--1961 Peabody Awards entry form.
Broadcast
1961
Created
1961
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Global Affairs
Subjects
Latin America--Social conditions--20th century.
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:29:09.648
Credits
Director: Lewis, Will
Host: Chanham, Erwin D. (Erwin Dain), 1904-1982
Interviewee: Senior, Clarence Ollson, 1903-1974
Interviewee: Matthews, Herbert Lionel, 1900-
Interviewee: Bradbury, Robert W.
Interviewee: Brenner, Anita, 1905-1974
Interviewee: Lima, Oswaldo, 1912-1973
Interviewee: Teichert, Pedro C. M.
Producer: Lewis, Will
Producing Organization: National Association of Broadcasters
Producing Organization: National Educational Television and Radio Center
Producing Organization: University of Florida. Radio Center
Producing Organization: University of Florida. School of Inter-American Studies
Producing Organization: University of Florida. School of Journalism and Communication
Speaker: Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963
Speaker: Camargo, Alberto Lleras
Speaker: Fals-Borda, Orlando
Speaker: Figueres Ferrer, Jose, 1906-1990
Writer: Lewis, Will
AAPB Contributor Holdings
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Citations
Chicago: “Contemporary Revolution in Latin America; No. 1; The Revolution of Rising Expectations,” 1961, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed September 21, 2021, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-s17ss81m.
MLA: “Contemporary Revolution in Latin America; No. 1; The Revolution of Rising Expectations.” 1961. American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. September 21, 2021. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-s17ss81m>.
APA: Contemporary Revolution in Latin America; No. 1; The Revolution of Rising Expectations. Boston, MA: American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-s17ss81m