thumbnail of Black Journal; 12
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Series
Black Journal
Episode Number
12
Producing Organization
WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)
Contributing Organization
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/512-rf5k932614
NOLA Code
BLJL
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Description
Episode Description
This episode contains the following segments. 1.A report on the black youth movement in the South. Black students at Duke University, Durham, NC, discuss their efforts to make education more "relevant" to their blackness. Duke has been the scene of demonstrations - support by a number of white students - for more black students and black-oriented curriculum. At an all-black school, Shaw University in Raleigh, NC, the efforts of students were instrumental in the reopening of a local cause celebre, the Marie Hill murder trial. The program also examines the tactics of black youth in the rural South, visiting Indianola, Mississippi, a town outside Jackson. At Fortier High School in New Orleans, "Black Journal" studies the upcoming high school revolution by Southern blacks. There, students are seen making demands similar to those of college youths - for black studies and an Afro-American club. 2. A photo-prose poem, "Just Like You." This segment uses still photos to visualize the message of poet Osborne Smith, who has also produced the segment. "Just Like You" is an affirmation of the goals of minority groups and the poor in America. 3. A discussion with Clifford Alexander, newly-resigned chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Clifford L. Alexander Jr., who charged that "a crippling lack of Administration support" led to his resignation as chairman of the Equal Opportunity Commission, will discuss the anti-poverty program under President Nixon. Alexander, although still a member of the commission, left his chairman's seat under pressure after being accused of "harassing" businessmen by Senator Everett Dirksen (R - IL). He will be interviewed by Robert Maynard, national correspondent, Washington Post, and James Booker, free-lance writer, formerly a political analyst for the Amsterdam News. 4. A segment relating to recent incidents at Cornell University, through the words of assistant dean of students Gloria I. Joseph. Demonstrations at Cornell University became a national issue after some black students were photographed leaving an occupied building with guns in hand. Miss Joseph contends that "the black students were not the initiators of any violence," but were "defending themselves from the attack of white fraternity males." She indicates that the problems at Cornell and other institutions are rooted in the "simple fact that the universities were not planned or constituted with black in mind. The white community must face the fact that negative responses to actions of black students are largely a reaction to their black ness." 5. Still photographs of the demonstrations at Cornell accompany Miss Joseph's remarks. "Black Journal" is an NET production (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Series Description
Black Journal began as a monthly series produced for, about, and - to a large extent - by black Americans, which used the magazine format to report on relevant issues to black Americans. Starting with the October 5, 1971 broadcast, the show switched to a half-hour weekly format that focused on one issue per week, with a brief segment on black news called "Grapevine." Beginning in 1973, the series changed back into a hour long show and experimented with various formats, including a call-in portion. From its initial broadcast on June 12, 1968 through November 7, 1972, Black Journal was produced under the National Educational Television name. Starting on November 14, 1972, the series was produced solely by WNET/13. Only the episodes produced under the NET name are included in the NET Collection. For the first part of Black Journal, episodes are numbered sequential spanning broadcast seasons. After the 1971-72 season, which ended with episode #68, the series started using season specific episode numbers, beginning with #301. The 1972-73 season spans #301 - 332, and then the 1973-74 season starts with #401. This new numbering pattern continues through the end of the series.
Broadcast Date
1969-05-26
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Race and Ethnicity
Media type
Moving Image
Duration
00:59:59
Credits
Executive Producer: Greaves, William
Host: Greaves, William
Host: House, Lou
Producing Organization: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-2 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 1 inch videotape: SMPTE Type C
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:58:30
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 2 inch videotape
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:58:30
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: U-matic
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Duration: 0:58:30
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-4 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: Digital Betacam
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Duration: 0:58:30
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-6 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-7 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-9 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-5 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832317-8 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Color: Color
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Citations
Chicago: “Black Journal; 12,” 1969-05-26, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed November 26, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-rf5k932614.
MLA: “Black Journal; 12.” 1969-05-26. Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. November 26, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-rf5k932614>.
APA: Black Journal; 12. Boston, MA: Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-rf5k932614