thumbnail of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer
Transcript
Hide -
If this transcript has significant errors that should be corrected, let us know, so we can add it to FIX IT+
the point i'm jim lehrer today's ms the outside a mastermind the turkey problem urban warfare and candidate moseley braun tonight on the newshour fb
fb is by news
be life and how good evening i'm jim lehrer on the newshour tonight a summary of them has the latest on the capture about tribal leader colleagues shaikh mohammad and look at what not having turkey onboard would do to us warplanes against a rack a report on us soldiers training for urban combat in a rack and our democratic presidential candidate conversation on a rack policy with carol moseley braun major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer has been provided by the world as one giant pharmacy a school where they don't dance to improve agricultural efficiency make food more affordable at the nature of what's to come and by
sb see communications as the season nearly one hundred and ninety thousand people are proud of what they can probably get a big company in a big responsibility on the surface this pc many many things the race was on a day to get information from the alleged mastermind of nine eleven before any new attacks rallied shaikh mohammed was arrested in pakistan on saturday the pakistani foreign office said the day he was still being held there under interrogation it was widely reported mama had been plotting more attacks in the united states and on the arabian peninsula when he was captured will have more on this in a moment director stuart more of its advanced missiles today under un orders
that makes sixteen demolished out of some one hundred and twenty iraqis threatened to stop the operation at united states war plans continue also today the un inspectors at a rack promised to submit a new report next week on its nerve gas and anthrax talks there was no word today on whether turkey would reconsider letting thousands of us ground troops deployed there they might be used to open a northern front in any war with iraq but the turkish parliament narrowly rejected that proposal on saturday and it was unclear if or when there might be another vote in washington a white house spokesman acknowledged it was a setback but he said it would not change the military outcome as a result of this pope turkey is gone back to look at it we're doing this and some clear as well what the ultimate outcome will be a there's no question that turkish approach would be a preferable approach that other approaches are available for other options from a military point
of view and the president has every confidence in those other options will indeed be militarily successful iffy so exercise kuwait indicated today it would accept us troops turned away from turkey if there's a formal request and thousands of kurds marched in northern iraq today they protested any move to send turkish troops into that region will have more on turkey and us war plans later in the program north korean fighter jets intercepted a man the us reconnaissance plane on sunday a pentagon spokesman said the day it happened over the sea of japan and lasted about twenty minutes he said the north koreans came within fifty feet of the us playing and one walk along with radar but he did not fire there was no immediate word on how many american crew members were a bore in nineteen sixty nine a north korean plane shot down a us surveillance planes killing thirty one americans israeli forces arrested leader the militant group hamas today during new raids into gaza we have a report from verify goal of associated press
television news eight palestinians lost their lives often clashes in the refugee camps among them a heavily pregnant woman devastation here in the parade refugee camp israeli troops blew up four homes the blast also damaged neighboring houses and a mosque one of those belonged to mohammad top a co founder of the militant group hamas he was later detained by the army does arrest as a turning point for the israelis say hamas has killed hundreds of people in terrorist attacks there are adamant that the incursion will carry on palestinian leader yasser arafat's of the raid was a continuation of aggression against his people his chief negotiator site there a cat called the us intervention to stop israel's actions over in the west bank israeli troops continued their search for a minute since the army's been operating not most which is as cool the hornet's nest of medicines
on and off for several weeks the israeli offensive began after hamas blew up an israeli tank since then at least forty four palestinians have been killed in a series of military raids the alleged leaders of the deadly november seventeenth terror group went on trial today in greece nineteen defendants appeared in a heavily guarded court today in athens they're accused of murders bombings an armed robberies going back twenty eight years the first victim was the cia station chief in athens killed in nineteen seventy five the marxist group eluded authorities until a wave of arrests last summer in us economic news today the commerce department reported consumer spending fell one tenth of a percent in january the first decline in four months and on wall street the dow jones industrial average lost fifty three points to close below seventy eight thirty eight the nasdaq fell seventeen points to close at thirteen twenty and that's it for the newshour
tonight now it's on to the big outcry that the rest the problem with turkey urban warfare and candidate moseley braun as bad as that historically golan begins with some background pakistani and us agents today analyze computers and documents from those residents outside islamabad where cia and local officials arrested how lead shaikh mohammad saturday early reports said he was in us custody of pakistani officials indicate otherwise but as the present positions concern is still invoke islam is being interrogated body of the oddities muhammad butt head of operations for our pride it is thought to be thirty seven or thirty eight years old born in kuwait he studied engineering at to north carolina colleges in the mid nineteen eighties soon after mohammad fought alongside osama bin ladin in the afghan war against the soviets he's considered a master of disguise and fake
identity the uncle of the man convicted in the nineteen ninety three world trade center bombing muhammad is directly linked to attacks on us embassies in africa the uss cole explosion off of yemen last year's bombing of a synagogue and tunisia that killed nineteen and the kidnapping and murder of american reporter daniel pearl stokes in nineteen ninety six a us court convicted mohammed in absentia of involvement in a plot to blow up us commercial jets over the pacific and to crash a plane into cia had as for september eleventh the lion's number three man told the al jazeera network last year he helped devise what he called holy tuesday at the white house spokesman ari fleischer hailed the arrest the president expressed is as deep appreciation and gratitude president bush are that the government of pakistan for their efforts as best we can that led to the capture of khalid shaikh muhammad the mastermind of september eleventh attack this is a very serious
development and a blow to our cotton separately homeland security secretary tom ridge said his agency raised the terror alert level last month in part because of a plot involving mohammad the alert level was lowered last week more on the arrest of our leadership muhammad from daniel benjamin a director for nashua for counter terrorism on the national security council during the clinton administration he recently co authored the age of sacred terror about the rise about content and zachary a blues not associate professor and director of asian studies at simmons college and boston is currently finishing a book about how kind of presence in southeast asia daniel benjamin any question that the stresses of this unrest is a very important event and stopping akana none whatsoever wrapping up culture group mohammad is one of the most important steps we could've taken and i think they're probably very high spirits at the cia right now penn and rightfully so you almost imaginative innovative and peripatetic terrorist operational chiefs
i would never sing how did you get to be this way what what what special skills or talents that he bring to this made him so special also affected well we don't know that much about every step of his career but he like many of the more successful terrorist operatives had their western training in engineering and in operations in iraq <unk> making the trains run and it has just been very very active for a long time a lot of six wanna be a success in this business is up is keeping busy not getting caught and he managed to do that for longer than anyone in the service of what would you add to that is why what made this man so successful on the one hand i think i would agree with what your other guest has just said something happened when he went to afghanistan to fight which are deemed that he did become radicalized he became really associated with his nephew ramzi yousef who went on to with his uncle to the philippines in nineteen ninety
four to perpetrate all planned coaching job they both alluded captured the time ramzi yousef was later captured by his capture angered colleague shaikh mohammad and ever since then he's been absolutely determined to create this network that that goes across some sixty countries speaking of that work as we reported in the new summer has been widely reported elsewhere as well that the big effort now is to move as quickly as possible on whatever information they found when they arrested him on saturday tell us what they're likely to have founded why would be important the most important things that they probably found were his cell phones and that would give you a sense of who he was communicating with either both through voice or text messaging the other thing would be his laptops because
he communicated so much to a soccer pitch was operatives through email so those didn't lists of his contacts are absolutely essential for an operation like this ideally you would like to keep the arrest as quiet as possible so the intelligence and police services have as long as possible to go and make the arrests of the people in those phones and email address books in this case they have to operate very quickly and everyone of why do you think they made it public so quickly or do we know when this man was even arrested go they couldn't go there had him for several weeks in the postseason since unlikely they were pretty straightforward about what it was the arrest was made it's possible that that happened possibly because it would happen in a public area within downtown are all candy and there was no way to keep it quiet it's also the case that he had acquired such an enormous reputation that this was a blow that
the administration held that it wanted to get out quickly as the last declaration of dan benjamin about what this could trigger a main note that the rush was take to get that to the follow up on the information before to try to stop some other attacks a war with the speculation was it might cause operatives out there are cod are pretty low or it might cause and the very quickly launched a major attack in the theory about them it's impossible to protect a lot of it depends on where a particular plots are in terms of their execution many operatives may go the ground in the hope that they will be found when the authorities go through the pocket litter go through via cell phone records go through the laptop others may decide that they have to carry out their operations as fast as possible it's it's actually impossible to predict and it's vital that the interrogations but turn something up or not likely to learn much for khalid shaikh muhammad himself is unlikely to cooperate but the literally caught him with is very very important
for jewish about what you think what will why would you not cooperate or why would equal well this is a man who's devoted his life for a blaster decade to killing americans and done my guess is he feels quite strongly about it and he's not likely to give up the goods on his colleagues your invasion that operation the real question is whether the fright that has been stolen by being arrested the threat of the death penalty or whatever might might change his mind but my guess is the hard an operative like this is not going to rule quickly you agree with their professor i do it this man is a very professional individual alive he is the most important person who's been caught so far he had his holes on every i'll try to sell out there he was in constant contact with him he knows how important he is to this network and he will do everything he can to stay quiet for as long as he can hold out on the same question that i asked dan benjamin a moment of
following up in fact in which you said let's say they get the cellphone data cellphone and if you're not that are pretty even in any place in the world and you've been talking to mom and on your cell phone in the last it's several days or weeks what would be your best guess of what that include the inclination of that agent would be there quickly going to have to run or to act as mr benjamin said there are two extremes on the one hand some people might flee and try to go underground on the other hand they might try to lash out as a retaliatory strike so we we just don't know and that i completely agree that it really depends where they are in terms of planning an exit and executing attack what do you think dan benjamin the connection is between where the relationship is between now mohammad and osama bin laden i don't know anything about their chrysalis and ship but it is
certainly the case that mohamed had become one of if not the very top chief of operations and that day shared a worldview and that muhammad was executing our view that there'd been won head articulated for so many muslims was some erratic cause i don't think about it started out with is chief lieutenant in and that job was held by one art half until he was killed by the predator in november and not afghanistan that was really the biggest strike we've had again stock it yet but at some point in the nineties they are joined forces in a more closely mirrored way than they had before and khalid shaikh muhammad had simply been an unbelievably productive member of the senior leadership of all kind of there's no question do we know enough about the structure of this organization know whether somebody else would very quickly stepped into this kind of chief of operations slot that mohamed hamed well we outside of government right now i'm outside of the circles of
intelligence probably don't know one of the things that that has been impressive about archivists throughout his that has been very capable of replacing people are there and we have no idea really how deep the benches and in fact one of the things about archives that has surprised the counterterrorism experts for so long it is just every time there's an attack every time there's a major crackdown we find out that there are so many more operatives than we had ever thought of you know before afghanistan there was a on a member of archivist top three or four ruling group and a double agent was picked up in germany in nineteen ninety eight and he seemed to simply been easily replace them and then they aren't being the group just went right along realization survive so we just all know there've been so many people locked out that it has to set them back a bit but how long is very hard to say oh you had to that professor about what this does to the uk operation generally well it is going to make it
harder for them text to attacks as mr benjamin said to him he was so central to the major attacks against american targets in the past few years that it will be all lost the organization but when mohamed out taft was killed he was quickly replaced by i was in baidoa when i was about was arrested in april two thousand to he was quickly replaced by khalid shaikh mohammad so the organization does have some strategic depth if we can add up all of the arrests of of their senior management it does take a toll on the organization the problem is there isn't a limitless pool of recruits to this organization are they take great pride in training and education bringing people up through the ranks so this organization has incredible
staying power and so we should not be too hopeful that things that out that is going to go away in any dramatic way because of what happened in pakistan on saturday well i think if the interrogations go as well as they can one of the best things that will happen is that we can deter any or prevent any attacks that are currently in the works as secondly we go we'd like to have a good job in rooting up some of that network by it like a cancer will simply metastasized and there will be new recruits your ruler i do agree with that i think that we may have bought ourselves a hiatus in which the group needs to regroup and then retrain and adapt itself to entirely new situation which they no longer had their training grounds afghanistan and they've lost much of their top leadership the important thing to remember about our kite is that it's not only an organization terraces a dynamic ideological movement
that is dedicated to spreading the worldview and in that regard they continue to be very successful we see that the polls show the lawn is very popular author of many parts of the islamic world and this is the long term worry that even if we make inroads now we may have to deal with the organization in another incarnation later down the line and as of popularity spreads it becomes more more dangerous gentlemen thank you both very much as now the turkish parliament no vote on us troops and what it could mean for allied warplanes plans when eichler has that story and with me is mark thompson time magazine's military correspondent mark this weekend's events in turkey that turkey's parliament rejection of the stuff is basing plan is widely considered to be quite a major setback for the us military plans for making a goat this in iraq against iraq so how how much of a setback was that
militarily well here's what i will tell it won and they've told me to lead us central command in florida that that they have other options but make no mistake about it going through turkey was their best option that was going to get the most troops into northern iraq as quickly as possible and really frets about to say that seems to have the last as long as the turkish parliament those reverses course let's talk about what are likely to be the other options well right now we've got a bunch of ships in the eastern mediterranean there waiting to go in through turkey with a red light stays red button after come down through the suez canal and go around the arabian peninsula and up to kuwait where there are lots of other ships waiting to get into ports there and unload here from hundred first airborne division and other us military units take a week to ten days to get him out of the eastern med and overtook away that's another week to ten days to actually unload them and get them ready to fight for talking twenty thirty days compared to maybe only ten in turkey there's some talk about a second resolution that they'd locked red
light turn to greene is there and another way our ever turned to yellowstone anyway besides going through the suez canal to get their appropriate troops and equipment on the ground will only go through turkey they can't go through turkey and then very many other options if you look at northern iraqi surrounded by iran turkey and syria and are not good ways for us military to get into northern are actually think about africa mall where i can year left equipment and yes i mean fundamentally if they do go to kuwait they still have a northern front but it'll be a skinny northern front instead of maybe the sixty thousand troops us military really wants to have could be a few as six or ten or perhaps twenty thousand and that's just not going to be a real big force to come down and take baghdad it may stop the fighting between the kurds the turks and that may protect the oil wells up in the us is concerned that saddam might light off what's not been a big a big armored thrust into baghdad let's talk about what it what is the advantage to be able to approach this from the north as well as the south but first we want to hear if you're trying to beat somebody up as were won by are trying to fight you can focus on hand if
there's two we've got a divert your attention you never know where the blows going to come from secondly if you if you if you've got that conundrum and it forces you to do you know in terms of intelligence firms of military might just a divided everything up the us military believes that this work and go quickly only divisible by fund approach going after saddam from several directions at once and if they'll have a few number of troops and in northern iraqi not going to be able to do that pretty much everything's don't have to come out from kuwait is done really in the focus has firepower there so you talk about the well was a northern part of iraq are talking about that the american troops are to the allied to the candidacies them so that he doesn't get to them first writer to gamble mr you know in the opening hours of the war was command of made it very clear that in addition to getting studs and in western iraq and one of our most important things is going to getting those oil wells or websites or we think weapons of mass destruction and those are the big three things to get us military in the opening hours
of the war now be tougher to do but we can come right over the border from turkey yasutaka you alluded to the sensitivities of owing the terpsichorean the kurds in that part of the rap how does that complicate the well this is part of a deal and if the united states were allowed to go in through turkey the turks were going to be allowed to send in some forty thousand troops along with the us troops to come twelve miles in the northern wrap so that kurds wouldn't flee up into turkey's refugees and ants are basically united states wanted a lot of forces in northern iraq to basically keep the kurds and the turks are partly that war for decades up there over the kurds desire to get an autonomous government we have it away pat military secrets as it's all been widely reported what we're talking about but how does one begin the military began to court native war when you can't get your troops in place well i think that's i mean tommy franks general for cyber command has said all along i got a bunch of options if this thing falls apart i've got an option fundamentally this is the best option we don't have to sort of schlepping around the arabian peninsula and it's just like an nba as knockout punches that might otherwise be and how much to delay are
we talking about the sense i get from military people is anywhere from ten days to two weeks they could speed it up by me out the lonely might want to wait a little longer but yet the tree that outcome of preparation in exchange for tactical surprised and i might give up some of the album of readiness and grab a tactical surprise instead became arkansas's a lot as always thank you still to come on the newshour tonight fighting in cities and carol moseley braun but first this is public on public television were taken ashore break now so your public television station can ask for your support that support helps keep programs like ours on the air hatch for those stations not taken a pledge break the newshour continues now with excerpts from today's pentagon briefing on the military's effort to protect soldiers against chemical and biological attack when you look at biological warfare agents that there are three important things to look at first can they make it can they get what they
need so that they can make a violent war for each that's not extremely difficult sites if you go on the internet and you so desire you can go out look there are groups out there who are even talk about how you can in fact make a violent war for at the next most difficult step is now you've got to be able to put it into usable for that's probably the most difficult step because the difficulty with most biological warfare agents is they're not very robust they actually under exposure to extremes of heat light and called die because think about it they're living organism that's how they operate to have to make it into a usable for them once you put it into usable form you then have to have a dissemination maines which is not as catastrophic would not be catastrophic for the biological warfare agent meaning exposing at that he that light
or that extreme cold in the process of putting it out as a consequence there selective agents which do very well anthrax with you for about three years is one of those because it's very robust many of the others are not as robust and so you prioritize new focus on those that you think potentially or the most years can you share with us a little bit about it thinking about the nature of the threat to billionaire iraq situation how would be the most likely to use these kinds of weapons how much of a window when they have are actually using them before the threat can be neutralized her with sure i get asked a question quite frequently and really start with we he'd understand saddam hussein and in everyone's way have to go back in history to understand an individual and most us over got the rock around war and then in fact some sign used chemical agents during iraq iran
war till susan vance's own countrymen the kurds they used to move or nerve agent against that during a rocker on war he used the mustard agent a nerve agents he used classic employment and what i mean by classic employment if you were to look at any of the old books that were out there from back in the days when we had an offensive program you'd see that exact same sort of employment using am persistent agent along the frontlines and then using your non persistent agents had to the rear so that as you made a breakthrough that you could move into that to carry now what's important understand history of porn understand history because we now know how he used his tactics will we do know is that everyone moves forward and so we have to understand that and we have to be prepared for potential different uses or employment i think the biggest thing we need to look at is that during the gulf war he had the same capability that he has to that
annie didn't use them then we have the opportunity because of that first we need to be concerned because he's used at the past but second we need to understand fully that he probably has some grave reservations about using those chemical biological agents border be prepared there are a lot of things you can track the give you indicators that and in fact they're getting ready to imports are from operational perspective you can anticipate that we're looking for that from a technical perspective as you look at the battlefield unless he plans on causing adverse evers actions for his own soldiers we will see indications that a tactical level that his soldiers are preparing for secure use or potential use of chemical biological agent if one of my daughters was there today i would be comforted that sure we're concerned about somebody being in war but i would be competent that they are trained that they got the right
equipment and the right place at the right time and that they have accomplished their mission training troops to fight a war in iran betty and now's reports from fort polk we see any teammate these soldiers are being trained to fight in an urban environment to take a city street by street revival of the environment with more time growing louder each day amid reports that saddam hussein soldiers were dug in baghdad this webinar sought training at fort polk tries to make it as real as possible when soldiers come to train they bring all of their own guns
ammunition supplies vehicles helicopters even takes a sense that is what they would have to do if they were actually deployed to the middle east colonel james terry is commander of the joint writing is training center this is as close to combat is it about that with the gay marriage birth to get the ticket sites that smell so much so that ever since the war in vietnam much of the american military involvement in the world has been in urban settings haiti and somalia and sometimes the prices and higher in nineteen ninety three and eighteen soldiers were killed seventy three wounded when americans to overthrow us mr retired marine colonel randy gamble an expert on urban assault training says that kind of scenario could happen again don't expect more is nice clean wars that we had in
desert storm or you know hardly anybody even got hurt or even had changed socks for that matter of the casualty rate in the urban battle field is about thirty percent so in other words if you have a infantry battalion of a thousand men you can expect about three hundred of them to be either dead or wounded at the first days of the fighting gamble says the casualty rate is so high because fighting door to door is inherently dangerous don't have battles who is without question the most difficult battle space it's a very strict and construct a battle space it's very complex because of the nature of the construction in the environment you get the multiple dimensions of subterranean the basement says some ways the number of tunnels or whatnot is the worst environment that said the military can operate and if you train for it it's a lot less dangerous
if you haven't trained for it it's as bad as it's going and that's why both the army and marine corps do this kind of training the army says it spends one million dollars a day getting its soldiers rather thousand acres of louisiana farmland swap land at fort polk had been turned into a made up country it's supposed to be like any third world place where the soldiers might be deployed today when the war against take place eleven times a year the good guys are played by the soldiers in training in this recent fourteen day exercise the good guys with the third brigade of the twenty fifth infantry division out of wine and the bad guys are also played by soldiers take the role of opposition to religious trying to take over the made up third world country when the two sides that they engage in a kind of laser tag their rifles are equipped
with technology that can record here it's on sensors placed on their uniforms and helmets when the center goes off that soldier is a casualty and put out of action each time the war games begin the opposition role as always have the upper hand that's because they trained in iran they're so good that they often slip sixty percent graduate carnal skip louis and then national weather the building behind you i have fallen out of those same buildings for four times the last six months so they know every corner they know that they will provide them a little different angle to fight from they know what they know where the sewers are they know how to skate they know where to get up into that it's they just they know the terrain very well although some of the soldiers of the third brigade have been through urban assault training before most had not especially young soldiers
like twenty year old private jason boyle just out of boot camp a lover is always like i'm going to bill monroe's band or a vacuum would then it's gonna come out lately and that find their other traffic control board captain david cry was boiled bravo company commander wood boiler other men through war rehearsals the afternoon before their first challenge they were going into the made up country to take over a small village from the relatives at and like most educated initial know i got an invite optimistic we'll deny us are out are really draw i had like one night vision goggled first thought now everybody's got the technologies that sebastian but when christ and his men deployed two o'clock in the morning he also knew from intelligence
reports that the gorillas could be waiting for them so he was prepared for the worst and the worst was what is bravo company got the character of our nation it's about an hour serve to clear up tale and all that is secured local areas and the chippewa catches sit down about a subordinate sixty or so then it was time for the most important part of the fourteen day exercise an all out assault on the main town of the made up country the mission once again take the town from the guerrillas the army spent fifty eight million dollars on the tail to make it look like any place american soldiers might have to fight in today more than a thousand cameras were installed inside an account holders so the actions of the soldiers can detain
and later an ally for two days before the attack the opposition role as the wire and other obstacles to make it harder for the us forces to get into the tail vj has soldiers and training routine and one of them got hung up on a piece of wire and eventually the soldiers in training move on they took over details public school than another building they've got stalled by the enemy they were also surprised by the presence of civilians who threw up their hands and the windows of one of the buildings they didn't let it in the town by the army to represent local resident as the us forces tried to establish an offensive position by moving bradley fighting vehicles into the streets but the opposition forces in the demo
at all night long there was heavy fighting is that us forces try to destroy the enemy and but i don't know if the men of the third brigade still had not secure the entire tale and they have taken a heavy casualties most of the men had been up for days many of them had contracted the flu in the two weeks and in the case of private jason boil it hadn't turned out to be so much fun after all in opposition or opt for a girl they had the upper hand and neuter a week though can not know too much about the territory were head guerilla warfare techniques more at cardinal war that would she learned tools and all of my rucksack a commandeered by laura allen fought for for months with nothing nothing just because of that
and for base commander colonel james terry it's at those lessons learned that some day and keep oil out of harm's way so is what to do water at the training center what to take away from her and how you improve and in that tend to love and a career that i didn't like in the urban assault expert gambles says soldiers today on exposed to enough training right now the the the average rain rain on the infantry or tank unit probably gets to the three weeks of the year we have found during our experimentation that it takes about four to five weeks of trying to achieve proficiency and proficiency equates to war casualty rates on both sides are frankly less collateral damage and cholesterol so before i go into three which were quite good whether in combat or not professional or on a proficiency that
training could well be tested in a matter of weeks right now there are more than two hundred thousand men and women are poised for battle against a rack in the middle east as anton it's an odd another in our conversations about iraqi and foreign policy with the democratic presidential candidates ray suarez has lights we start this week off with ambassador carol moseley braun she's fifty five a graduate of the university of illinois chicago and the university of chicago law school she served as an assistant us attorney in chicago from nineteen seventy three to nineteen seventy seven moseley braun was elected to the illinois general assembly in nineteen seventy eight she was elected cook county recorder of deeds in nineteen eighty eight the first black woman ever to hold that position for years later she made history again when she was the first black woman elected to the
united states and she lost a reelection bid in nineteen ninety eight in nineteen ninety nine when president clinton named her ambassador to new zealand she joins us now from chicago and as i'm a mosley braun welcome thank you fill it with it well one of the places where the large and growing democratic field has differentiated itself was sometimes from the president often with each other is over iraq questions of war and peace and how best to handle saddam hussein what's your position what i want to be a voice of hope for people who believe that we are clever enough to defeat terror without sacrificing our liberty that we are creative enough to provide for peace and prosperity and progress in our time that we can come together as americans to face the challenges of our time and i believe that this administration is on the absolute wrong track architect leigh as regard to using the war on terror as a subterfuge as a cloak if you will for what is
really an extreme political agenda would just today iraqi forces to show weapons inspectors so where bombs had been buried perhaps with chemical agents in them of crushed some more of those missiles of broken up equipment used to make weapons doesn't that point to world what the pressure of an imminent war can bring we'll something and there's no question but that saddam hussein has a bad back and that we need to work with our allies to make certain that the inspections work and that he is disarmed but the fact is that the war against terror is broader than just sit down saying it didn't you know i was delighted to date the news that that one of their lives operatives had been captured this is the first time we've heard the alarm even spoken about in a while because base more than lyden into saddam hussein made the focus there what concerns me raise that they won't level with the american people about the costs
of this war how much it whether the residents range from sixty five to two hundred billion dollars and then there's a big question mark we don't know will be in there for three days three weeks three months or three years oh we don't have a sense of that no information about the exit strategy of the planning so they've used all the focus of focused everybody in on saddam hussain and defeating this bad guy while we have at the same time patriot act one patriot act to something called the passenger profiling not to mention total information awareness and our liberties being our privacy rights being taken from us as well as mean spirited in some regards cuts and budget program so we in education are an environmental protection are the cubs all throughout this budget in areas that i think american people would be very very concerned about if the focus wasn't so redirected and when you look at what's happening with state and local governments
facing huge deficits that they want get any help or support for as well as i now the record national deficit of three hundred billion dollars from a surplus when mr matt together what the heck are people who are using our pain to disguise the whole lot of activity that's not being folks then on i hope to use this presidential campaign as an opportunity to talk about whether or not we think it's a good thing to cut teacher training and technology in education and healthcare for poor people in and healthcare for seniors are always what's really going on and terms of this administration's direction is bad for america and that's why when the president will be faced with a terrorist threat today headquartered in one particular country but spread elsewhere are faced with a very unstable very important region of the world in the mideast in the persian gulf what would president moseley braun have done or wood
well in the first instance it really is still a dangerous world i don't i'm not arguing that we have to take proactive steps to meet the threat of terror absolutely positively we want to provide for the domestic security the american people and that has got to be a primary concern but the fact the matter is that the that the terrorism that we suffered as americans didn't spring out of iraq i'm a really good and then they were the they were not iraqis in fact if anything with finding most of the intelligence information and most of the leagues we've gotten have been from other parts of the region such as pakistan are such as this is saudi's were involved with that much and like and so and so to find which is not sure this problem by wiping this bad guy off the face of the planet is not enough we have to be smart about how we fight terrorism it's not just enough to fight it we got a piece with that if i get smart and find ways to provide for our domestic security all the long haul and when you're looking at the way this
money is just kind of just going up in smoke literally we have to as i think if the administration would a level with the us and say you know this really is about oil then we could have a better sense of whether or not the money that we are paying the burden there were carrying ourselves alone in this case out whether it's worth all of that or whether or not they are smarter and more clever ways to do this will what does the united states in your view do now there are a large number of personnel stationed with their equipment overseas ready to go at a moment's notice to climb down to keep the pressure on in the area oh i think the pressure has to stay on in the area i think that frankly the eye we should applaud the efforts to get saddam hussein to step down he's been bad for his country has been bad for the reason he's bad he's bad news all way around so getting him out of power would be a good thing if it comes about as a result of diplomacy but that's not what we're doing in fact if anything the baby diplomats the diplomatic
relationship sweet head around the world have been shut down how we are more an odds now with people who've traditionally been our friends we for this country as this administration has frittered away the goodwill that we inherited actor september eleventh when the whole world was on our side now we look up and see huge marches against the approach that we've taken somebody ought to think well maybe we ought to listen a little bit to our allies and what they have to say maybe they have some ideas maybe they have some intelligence maybe by working together you know learning to work well with others we could do a better job in defeating terrorism which ought to be our objective so for instance how would you use the united nations in their kids well obviously the united nations has a crucial central role to play in all of this if as a clearinghouse of nothing else of information an end and relationships where people can grow wheat come together with our allies are to address these issues at the united nations sponsorship
of the inspections that the inspections that are going on in iraq right now he writes not the only place where inspections need to happen we're also threatened by other are unstable states with the nuclear an or weapons of mass destruction capacity now so we will need a united nations to help us deal with the threat from north korea for example we will need a united nations to help work out a resolution with regard to the whole standoff between india and pakistan when there are a number of places around the world not to mend in big coming to some kind of stability that provides for peace in the middle east on i think both things are still possible i think it is possible to have peace i think it is possible to use they didn't did the strain of art of the goodwill that we enjoyed around the world but the direction that this administration is taking is one of alienating and deprecating be our allies around them world not giving
them the support and again re i keep coming back to the point taking it out of the tide to the american people not just in terms of misplaced budget priorities but also in terms of taking away liberties then we i mean that make us americans were entitled to be able to drive a car without having somebody monitoring titled not to have it male track and and i hadn't seen this administration taking those kinds of steps under the guise of fighting terrorism ought to be frightening i think to most americans i think it is ambassador power moseley braun thanks for being with us thank you we will talk with a reverend al sharpton tomorrow night yeah half as in the major developments of this day the alleged architect of nine eleven i mean shock shake mama was under interrogation actors weekend arrest in pakistan and there was no word on whether turkey would reconsider its decision to
bar us ground troops will see a long line and again here tomorrow evening i'm jim lehrer thank you and goodnight major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer has been provided by imagine a world that would not diminishing resources they call and by spca communications committed to providing americans more choices in high speed internet access and working to widen opportunities in broadband technology as providers as people we're spca communications this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to a pbs station he was liking yankee
need this because it's been to bridges video cassettes of the news hour with jim lehrer call one eight six six six seven eight news fb
fb
fear and how good evening i'm jim lehrer on the newshour tonight a summary of them is the latest on the capture about pride a leader hot lead shaikh mohammad and look at what not having turkey onboard would do to us war plans against a rack a report on us soldiers training for urban combat in a rack and our democratic presidential candidate conversation on a rack policy with carol moseley braun major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer has been provided by the world as one giant pharmacy a school where they don't dance to improve agricultural efficiency make food more affordable at the nature of what's to come and by sb see communications and bisbee sees nearly one hundred and ninety thousand people
Series
The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer
Producing Organization
NewsHour Productions
Contributing Organization
NewsHour Productions (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/507-zp3vt1hk3p
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/507-zp3vt1hk3p).
Description
Episode Description
This episode's headline: Mastermind; War Plan; Urban Warfare; The Candidates. ANCHOR: JIM LEHRER; GUESTS: DANIEL BENJAMIN; ZACHARY ABUZA; MARK THOMPSON; CAROL MOSELEY BRAUN; CORRESPONDENTS: KWAME HOLMAN; RAY SUAREZ; SPENCER MICHELS; MARGARET WARNER; GWEN IFILL; TERENCE SMITH; KWAME HOLMAN
Date
2003-03-03
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Social Issues
Global Affairs
War and Conflict
Military Forces and Armaments
Politics and Government
Rights
Copyright NewsHour Productions, LLC. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode)
Media type
Moving Image
Duration
01:04:09
Embed Code
Copy and paste this HTML to include AAPB content on your blog or webpage.
Credits
Producing Organization: NewsHour Productions
AAPB Contributor Holdings
NewsHour Productions
Identifier: NH-7576 (NH Show Code)
Format: Betacam: SP
Generation: Preservation
Duration: 01:00:00;00
If you have a copy of this asset and would like us to add it to our catalog, please contact us.
Citations
Chicago: “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” 2003-03-03, NewsHour Productions, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed October 28, 2021, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-507-zp3vt1hk3p.
MLA: “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.” 2003-03-03. NewsHour Productions, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. October 28, 2021. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-507-zp3vt1hk3p>.
APA: The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. Boston, MA: NewsHour Productions, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-507-zp3vt1hk3p