thumbnail of The diary of Samuel Pepys; Chapter nine
Transcript
Hide -
Diary of SIMON Well Pete and a story called entertainment. Produced by radio station Casey you are FM love the University of Missouri at Kansas City. When peeps began his diary and 16 60 he was a poor clerk at the Exchequer and a man of all errands to his great Cousin Edward Montague. As an admiral of the fleet it was Montague who brought Charles second home to England and peeps was aboard the ship as secretary to his cousin in appreciation Charles made Montague Earl of Sandwich and a knight of the Garter through sandwich peeps received his position as clerk of the Acts of the Navy in which he was to become the greatest naval administrator Englanders ever known. He lived with his French wife Elizabeth and their servants in a house provided with his position in seething lane next to the Navy office. His diary which he kept faithfully for nine years is the most evocative history of the restoration
period and the most honest personal record of a man's daily life in existence. But I am Samuel peeps. Chapter 9. In which Sam sees a traitor hanged drawn and quartered. That's his cousin Laurent sandwiches new home of the great wardrobe. And makes arrangements for his sister Paul to live in his house in seething Wayne. Neyens October 16 60 just so w pandai 2 title where I went to the Lord sent witch and sought his chamber his picture. Very well done and I'm with child till I get it copied out which I hope to do when he is gone to see Mr. Prin told us of one damn food. That being a black man did scold his
beard with mince pie and it came up again all white in that place and continued to his dying day. 11th October to walk in St. James's Park where we observed the several engines at work to draw up water with which side I was very much pleased. Here in the park we met with Mr. Saul's Bray who took Mr Creed and me to the cockpit to see the mood of Venice which was well done. Burt acted the more by the same token a very pretty lady that sat by me cold out to see Desdemona smothered with Mr Creed the pillars where we drank 12th October the latest sandwich come to town and showed the most extraordinary love and kindness. 13th October I went out to Charing Cross to see Major General Harrison hanged drawn and quartered which was done there he looking as cheerful as any man could do in
that condition. He was presently cut down and his head and heart shown to the people at which there were great shouts of joy. It said that he said that he was sure to come shortly at the right hand of Christ to judge them that doll had judged him and that his wife do expect his coming again. Thus it was my chance to see that King beheaded at White Hall and to see the first blood shed in revenge for the king at Charing Cross. Setting up shelves in my study. 14 dart over more today. To White Hall chapel where one Dr. Crafts made an indifferent sermon and after it an anthem Il Sung which made the king laugh. Here I first did see the princes royals and she came into England here I also observed how the Duke of York and Mrs. Palmer did talk to one another very wantonly through the hangings that parts the Kings closet where the ladies
sit. Fifteenth doctor this morning Mr. Kuroda was hanged and quartered at Charing Cross but his quarters by a great favor are not to be hanged up 16 Doc tober being come home will he WERE told me that my lord had a mind to speak with me to night. So I returned by water. He seemed to be in a melancholy humor which I was told by W. How was for that he had lately lost a great deal of money at cards which he fears he do too much and deep himself to nowadays. 18th October this morning it being expected that Colonel hacker and Axtell should die. I went to New get but found they were reprieve till tomorrow. Say Turner sent for a pair of doves that my wife had promised her and because she did not send them in the best cage she sent them back again with a scornful letter with which I was angry but he had pretty well pleased that she was
crossed 900 The October. This morning my dining room was finished with green serge hanging in gilt leather which is very handsome. This night I sat up late to make my accounts ready against a model from a Lord 20th October. I dined with my lord and lady. He was very merry and he talked very high. How he would have a French cook and a master of his horse and his lady and child to wear black patches which me thought was strange. But he is become a perfect courtier So afternoon going through London and calling it the upholsterers and S. But all of me it was I saw the limbs of some of our new traitors set upon alders gate which was a sad sight to see and a bloody week this and the last to be in there being ten hanged drawn and quartered. 22nd October all preparing for the Lord's going to seed to fetch the queen
tomorrow at night Minorca come home with whom I stayed long and talked of many things I got need to have his picture. That was done by nearly copied 23rd October when Mr. Shipley's pistols charged with bullets flew off and it pleased God that the mouth of the gun being turned downwards it didn't snow hurt. But I think I never was in more danger in my life. Kerryman Lawrence pictured to Mr decrypts to be copied 24th October. Mr Moore tells me among other things that the Duke of York is now sorry for is and more with my Lord Chancellor's daughter who is now brought to bed of a boy. I went to see Mr. Greatorex where I bought of him a drawing pen and he did show me the manner of the lamp glasses which carried the light. A great way. Good to read in bed by and I intended to have one of them and we looked at his wooden Jack and his chimney that
that goes with the smoke which indeed is very pretty. So to Mr. Little is with Mr. Spong where well received there being a club tonight among his friends among the rest. A squire Ashmole who I found was a very ingenious gentleman. With him we to segue afterwards and Mr. Lee's study. Twenty sixth October to Westminster Hall and bought among other books one of the life of our Queen which I read at home to my wife. But it was so silly read that we did nothing but laugh at it. Among other things it's dedicated to that paragon of virtue and beauty. The Duchess of Albemarle ha 27 the October after dinner to Whitehall chapel. I believe it is related to mama Di up to the king's closet who is now gone to meet the queen. So meeting with one Mr. Hill that did noble lady he
did take us into the king's closet and there we did stay all service time which I did think a great honor. Twenty ninth October I up early being the Lord's Mayor's Day and neglecting my office I went to the wardrobe where I met my lady sandwich and all the children and after drinking of some strange and incomparable good clarinet to one Mr. Isaacson's Glidden Draper at the quay in Cheapside where there was a company of fine ladies and we were very civilly treated in a very good place to see the pageants which were many. And I believe good for such kind of things but in themselves but poor and absurd they Davis's now come to our next lodgings and has locked up the lead's door from me which puts me in great disquiet. Thirty first October much troubled about my walk on the LEDs. But we are all unwilling to anger me Lady Davis.
November 1st this morning so W. Pen and I were mounted early and had a very merry discourse all the way he being very good company. We come to so W. Batten's where he lives like a prince and we were made very welcome here dined with us two or three more country gentleman among the rest. As to Christmas by old schoolfellow with whom I had much talk. He did remember that I was a great round head when I was a boy and I was much afraid that he would remember the words that I said the day the king was beheaded. That when I had to preach about him my text should be the memory of the wicked shall rot. But I found afterwards that he did go away from school before that time. Second of Ember in Paul's Churchyard I called it curtains and there they had got a mass book for me which I bought and cost me twelve shillings.
When I come home sat up late and read it in great pleasure with my wife to hear that she was long ago acquainted with it. I observed this night very few bonfires in the city not above three in all London for the Queen's coming. Whereby I guessed that as I believed before coming to please but very few 7th November went by water to my lord when I dined with him and he in a very merry humor. And I don't raise an opinion of him to be one of the most secret men in the world which I was not so convinced of before. After dinner he did go out of the room and did tell me how the king had promised him four thousand pounds per annum for ever and had already given him a bill under his hand which he showed me for four thousand pounds that Mr. Fox is to pay him. But I wanted advise with me how to get this received and to put out three
thousand pounds into save hands that use and the other he will make use of for his present occasion. This he did advise with me about with the greatest secrecy. After all this he called for the fiddles and books and we two and W. Howard Mr. child did sing and play some Psalms of Will losses and some songs. And so I went away. 8th November on board the Dutch yacht which indeed is one of the finest things that I ever saw for neatness and room in so small a vessel. But to win the morning my wife up who showed me her head which was very well dressed. The 11th November Lord's day to church in our new gallery the first time it was used there be no woman this day. We sat in the foremost pew and behind our servants and I hope it will not always be said of not being handsome for our servants to sit so equal to
us. 12 November my father and I discourse seriously about my sisters coming to live with me and yet I am much afraid of nature. I told her plainly my mind was to have a come not as a sister but as a servant which she promised me that she would and with many thanks did weep for joy. Just. In Chapter 10 of the diary of Samuel peeps Sam's wife Elizabeth dines with Lord and Lady sandwich. The peeps is watch royalty at dinner. And make a trip by barge. The diary of Samuel peeps was edited by Gloria Scott read by James
Please note: This content is only available at GBH and the Library of Congress, either due to copyright restrictions or because this content has not yet been reviewed for copyright or privacy issues. For information about on location research, click here.
Series
The diary of Samuel Pepys
Episode
Chapter nine
Producing Organization
University of Missouri at Kansas City
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-vx062m8j
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-vx062m8j).
Description
Episode Description
This program presents dramatizations of portions of the diary of seventeenth century naval administrator, Samuel Pepys.
Other Description
This series dramatizes portions of the diary of Samuel Pepys, an English naval administrator who provided invaluable writings from the English Restoration period.
Date
1967-05-03
Topics
History
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:14:04
Credits
Producing Organization: University of Missouri at Kansas City
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 67-14-9 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:14:39
If you have a copy of this asset and would like us to add it to our catalog, please contact us.
Citations
Chicago: “The diary of Samuel Pepys; Chapter nine,” 1967-05-03, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed January 24, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062m8j.
MLA: “The diary of Samuel Pepys; Chapter nine.” 1967-05-03. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. January 24, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062m8j>.
APA: The diary of Samuel Pepys; Chapter nine. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062m8j