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You're listening to music by Don DeLillo's and this is done it was saying welcome to our third broadcast programs which are brought to you each week by the national educational radio network. I must explain to you that on this series I wear multiple hats in that. All of the music which you hear was written by your host and commentator who also writes These own scripts. And then after combining words and music into a neatly time 29 minutes and 30 seconds or so sends it all out to the headquarters of the national educational radio network who then sends it to your station and they play it for you. That's how it all comes about and I mention it only to explain that the many references to me by me are not a part of a self aggrandizement psychosis but rather a necessary from time to time to keep you properly informed. Now with all of his background we'll move on to the program content of this third broadcast one designed to offer a variety of music
including a brief March with a tongue in cheek title. So music for string orchestra a movement from a woodwind quintet and a very happy sounding trombone solo. And now as they say in radio our show begins as we hear music with the title taken from your very own calendar January February March. With thing with. At the. End the thing. With. With. With.
I am. Using. Google. It could.
That was the January February March which is really not a march about January or February at all but a rather bad pun which I picked up while playing in Bonneville houses back in Texas many years ago. Incidentally the title of that marches led to a lot of performances of it a little later I want to take up the subject of music titles to try to explain some of my own philosophy about such things. But at this moment I see by my notes that I'm supposed to tell you about the music we're going to hear next. Its title is three sketches for strings the three movements which we're going to hear now are titled daydreams whimsy and enchantment. And Dr. George C. Wilson has recorded them especially for this broadcast with the strings of the Interlochen Arts Academy orchestra. Three sketches four strings.
Why.
Why. Why.
Daydreams whimsey and in Chapman three sketches for strings played by the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra under the baton of Dr. George C. Wilson in a performance done especially for our broadcast series. The music was written by your host and commentator Don galas who although he is reluctant to keep on saying his own name so much for fear it will sound modest knows no other way to get the information across. It's a funny thing about matters like this some of my friends have told me Give us a say why don't you take yourself more seriously in your script writing. How can people think you're a profound thinker unless you act like this music is the most important thing in the whole world. Well the truth is I would like the music to speak for itself. I've never been an individual who enjoyed making a mystery out of composition or who went around acting important simply because a new symphony or opera had been completed. So if my commentary sounds whimsical occasionally or non profound it is moralize because that's how I am and any other approach would sound phoney at
least to me. Take for example this next music to be played by the Interlochen Arts Academy faculty woodwind quintet. It's title is sermonette Southern style and it represents a memory of a type of revival meeting that I used to see in my childhood. I could have given it a more profound title such as a study in religious rhythm matics for would we uns or an introspective exploration into subconscious reflections upon exhortations about eternity in rondo form yet. But even though it might be more provocative it wouldn't express me nearly as well and so complete with a lack of profundity here is sermonette southern style. And please have your money ready when the ushers pass the collection plate won't you.
Sermon at Southern style played by the Interlochen Arts Academy faculty woodwind quintet. Music by Don go is continues now with the dialogue for trombone and band right by the Texas Christian University band with my brother Louis skilless as Trombone soloist. The work is divided into three sections the first in a sort of freestyle conversational episode. The second is a quiet blues mood and the finale is a recapitulation of the original materials more I'm asked. Here it is now dialogue for trombone and band.
And when I am. I am. The way I am. I am honored.
Am. I am.
Yes I don't want the one. With this performance of the dialogue for trombone and band played by the Texas Christian University band and my brother Louis is drum on soloist. We have come to the end of another broadcast of music by Don Gillis. Earlier we heard sermon at Southern style three sketches for strings on the January February March. Next week we'll be back with more music this time a familiar favorite ranch house party from Portrait of a frontier town the tango lullaby from the Twinkletoes ballet and a score for Chamber Orchestra with woodwind soloist the title for scenes from yesterday. Music by Don go once is produced for the national educational radio network by Riverdale productions and directed by Keith Donaldson. This is Daniel was saying thanks for listening and hoping you'll
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Series
The Music of Don Gillis II
Episode
Three Sketches for Strings and more
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-vx062k8b
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-vx062k8b).
Description
Episode Description
This program features performances of the following Gillis compositions:Three Sketches for Strings, conducted by Dr. George Wilson; Sermonette, Southern Style; Dialogue for Trombone and Band.
Other Description
This series features the works of Don Gillis; hosted by the composer himself. Most of the performances are conducted by the composer.
Broadcast Date
1965-09-27
Topics
Music
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:29:48
Credits
Composer: Gillis, Don, 1912-1978
Conductor: Wilson, George C., 1908-2001
Host: Gillis, Don, 1912-1978
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 65-36-3 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:29:35
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Citations
Chicago: “The Music of Don Gillis II; Three Sketches for Strings and more,” 1965-09-27, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed May 19, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062k8b.
MLA: “The Music of Don Gillis II; Three Sketches for Strings and more.” 1965-09-27. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. May 19, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062k8b>.
APA: The Music of Don Gillis II; Three Sketches for Strings and more. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-vx062k8b