thumbnail of Organ music of the centuries; Classical and Romantic organ music, part two
Transcript
Hide -
Alabama call a jet Montevallo Alabama in cooperation with the National Association of educational broadcasters presents all good music of the centuries an historical recital series of bi of organ music featuring Putnam Porter organise. Today's tape recorded broadcast features music written during the romantic era of composing music written by SES are from. Although Frank wrote only 13 compositions for the pipe organ. He has come to be known as the outstanding composer for the organ during the last half of the 19th century. Born in 18 22 in Belgium Frank moved to Paris when he was a small boy. He spent the rest of his life in Paris teaching at the Paris Conservatory and was organist at the church of St.. Old until the time of his death in 1890. P.S. air all week is a composition of great feeling and power as are all of Frank's works composed in 1878. It is probably
one of those composers most popular compositions for the organ. Importer opens this program of organ music of the centuries with SES R. Franks arrow week.
The pipe organ is one of the oldest musical instruments known to man. There is no authentic record of the first organ but one legend points out that a mechanically minded Barber first experimented with sound production produced by air in pipes around the year 250 B.C.. His machine employed water which was pumped into the bottom of a vase forcing air through a crude trumpet arrangement which in turn produced a powerful sound. This particular machine caused so much admiration it was consecrated to the temple of Venus. Other research has indicated that the pipes of Pan were the original source of the organ and still other studies point out that the ancient Mesopotamians and Egyptians even before the Greeks had instruments which resembled an organ. An early instrument or machine employing water as the compressing and steadying power for the air was called an hydrolysis and became exceedingly popular and was for centuries a source of
admiration and astonishment. The powerful sound the mysterious pumping of the water the exertions of the slaves who were obliged to pump furiously to supply air of sufficient quantity all combined to attract attention to it. When water was no longer used to study the air pressures organs built with regular bellows came into use and were called pneumatic organs to distinguish them from the hydrolysis. Even after the changeover to bellows powered organs. The instruments were extremely clumsy. Keys were often six inches wide and the organist was obliged to strike each key with his clenched fist. The invention of the pedal keyboard and the reduction in size of the manual keys occurred around 14 seven days. From the beginning of the sixteenth century until the early part of the 19th. Very little improvements were made in organ building except a gradual improvement of the pipework.
Even though the organ has such great antiquity and a more or less constant evolution. There have been as many improvements made in it both totally and mechanically in the past thirty to fifty years as in the many centuries previous. Organ music of the centuries continues as Putnam Porter plays sais or francs apiece which reflects the mystic feeling and spiritual quality of Frank's composing.
All the old sayings are Franks a genius as a composer was not generally recognized during his lifetime. He has been called the founder of modern French music. A great composer and teacher. How does his pupils such noted French musicians as do park Vieira turn him ear. Frank was a devout Christian and his great faith and spiritual convictions are reflected in his music. Sales are Frank's three great corrals for the organ where they last compositions he wrote before his death in 1890. In composing the three corrals. It is believed that Frank was attempting glorification of the Holy Trinity. And importer concluded this program of organ music of the centuries with Frank's Caroll and a minor third of these three great corrals.
Lol.
Please note: This content is only available at GBH and the Library of Congress, either due to copyright restrictions or because this content has not yet been reviewed for copyright or privacy issues. For information about on location research, click here.
Series
Organ music of the centuries
Episode
Classical and Romantic organ music, part two
Producing Organization
Alabama College
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-rx93d040
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-rx93d040).
Description
Episode Description
This program presents performances of organ compositions by Cesar Franck.
Other Description
Highlights of noted organ music selections from various periods, including Pre-Baroque and Baroque; Classical and Romantic; and Modern.
Broadcast Date
1955-01-01
Topics
Music
Subjects
Organists--France.
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:29:42
Credits
Host: Sears, Ralph
Performer: Porter, Putnam
Producing Organization: Alabama College
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 55-22-14 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:29:30
If you have a copy of this asset and would like us to add it to our catalog, please contact us.
Citations
Chicago: “Organ music of the centuries; Classical and Romantic organ music, part two,” 1955-01-01, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed January 24, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-rx93d040.
MLA: “Organ music of the centuries; Classical and Romantic organ music, part two.” 1955-01-01. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. January 24, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-rx93d040>.
APA: Organ music of the centuries; Classical and Romantic organ music, part two. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-rx93d040