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Negro music and American. Negro music and American exploration of it and its impact on American culture. Here is your host for the series Tony look at Bach during the past few weeks we've listened to classical piano ragtime in writings that were composed and arranged for a band instrumentation. Today in a small way the numbers we play will straight the influence ragtime had on jazz. The rhythmic flow of rags became even more complex in the New Orleans environment of Tony Jackson and Jelly Roll Morton on jelly rolls apart he added a walking bass and increase swing. My first two numbers are really one number Morton's composition grandpa's spells played by him as a piano solo back in 1923 and then as he recorded it with his red
hot peppers in a victor session in 1926 in 1926 grandpa's bells had become hot jazz.
The next two numbers represent a later development of Ragtime which in New York City became known as house party or rent party or Harlem piano style. And actually it was a balanced blend of ragtime and more pronounced African rhythms. Fats Waller a brilliant pianist and bandleader and composers showed strong ragtime influence in his music. His first number as a piano solo the valentines dump composed and played for a victory recording session in 1929. That's when his band then plays squeeze me. It's a fine illustration of his music combined with his genius as an entertainer.
Where like you come on I get oh oh you know me.
Man. Next week we'll bring to you some great instrumental rags that will really illustrate how
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Series
Negro music in America
Episode Number
31
Producing Organization
WSIU 8 (Television station : Carbondale, Ill.)
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-fj29dt2h
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Description
Episode Description
This program, the thirty first of thirty nine parts, presents various examples of African-American folk and jazz music.
Other Description
This series focuses on music created and performed by African-Americans, including folk, and jazz styles. This series is hosted by Anton Luckenbach of Carbondale, Illinois, who also gathered interviews in New Orleans for this series.
Broadcast Date
1967-07-07
Topics
Music
Race and Ethnicity
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:14:51
Credits
Host: Luckenbach, Anton
Producing Organization: WSIU 8 (Television station : Carbondale, Ill.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 67-1-31 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:14:34
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Citations
Chicago: “Negro music in America; 31,” 1967-07-07, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed August 9, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-fj29dt2h.
MLA: “Negro music in America; 31.” 1967-07-07. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. August 9, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-fj29dt2h>.
APA: Negro music in America; 31. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-fj29dt2h