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From Music Hall in Cincinnati we present another concert by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Recorded during a performance by WGC University of Cincinnati radio station. These programs are made possible through a grant from the national educational radio network and with the cooperation of the Cincinnati musician to aviation. Max Rudolf is music director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. And on this program the soloists are David and Igor Oistrakh. Each of them will play a concerto. It will open the program they join in the Bach Concerto in D minor for two violins and orchestra. David I struck stands today as one of the world's great violinists. Yet it wasn't until 1955 that audiences in the United States had the opportunity to hear him except by the few recordings that found their way to this country and at that time we struck was 46 and had been long established on the continent. It looks as though the voice broke tradition and violin virtuosity is here for some time to come because David son Igor has already made a great name for himself on the concert stage. After the Bach Double Concerto which we are to hear shortly. Igor plays the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto.
And David Oistrakh concludes a program with a Beethoven concerto about concertos for single double or triple solo instruments are all more or less interchangeable with various instruments other than the ones for which they were written work which we are about to hear exists also as a two cleverer concerto in C minor. Now the soloist David then you go and are with conductor in a moment program began with the minor. Violin. Now by. The end. Of the book. The end.
To end. The end. Of. The book. The end. Of the book. Eh by. The by. The Be. The end. Of. It. The end. To
end. In. The end. The end. The end. The end. And. The bad. I am. In. The end. The end. Eh. Eh eh. Yeah but. Yeah but. The airplane.
But. The butt. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Thank. You. For. The Bill. And. And.
And. And. And. And. And where. And. When we. Meet one. On one. And. Winner. The Bowie.
The boa. Oh and the big. The big. Oh oh oh. Oh oh. Oh oh oh. Oh and. The Baron. Cohen. The book. We went. On. The bus.
Oh oh. Oh oh oh oh. Oh oh oh oh. The big. Winner. Oh oh oh. Oh oh oh oh. Oh. Oh oh oh. Oh oh. The boy. Thank.
You Owen. Oh and. With. The bow and. Meet. With. The bank and. The bank. The web has. Ears. And the. Length. Of. The book. Now. Many.
Thanks. And we. Thank. You. Thank. The owned. Bank and the big. Banks. Oh anywhere with. The boy.
With. Us. And. When. The boa. Thank. You and. Thank you. Thank you. Thank when. We get. Them. Oh you. Mean. Now be. The bad. Guy. Ed. Thank.
Ye. The boy. Oh. Thank. Ye. Ye but. It. Ain't. The end. Thank. Ye.
Ye. Ye by. The by. The bye. Eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh. Eh eh.
Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh. Wow. Wow. Wow. What. An engine. In. The end. The end. Thank.
You at. The end. Eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh. Eh eh by. The End of. The end. The end. Which. Way. Had. The
easy. Way. Was the. Way. You know David and the boys. Playing by this music hall audience for their brilliant performance of the Bach double compared with him tonight a huge win for New Yorkers by so much Rudolph exchanging Hendrix with the artist and. The audience. The orchestra members rise to the right rock. Now leading with a magnificent display of
cool. And now the voice box reappear as the audience delighted to watch with the great violinist. Anticipating the balance of the program. Baby boy dropped off during the Beethoven piano next Mendelssohn when the miners. Were born. Next on this program a performance of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto and a minor Opus 64. By Igor Oistrakh. The concerto we're about to hear has been called by some critics. The perfect violin concerto. It was written three
years before Mendelssohn's death at the age of 38. The Victorians held Mendelssohn in very high regard but as fashions changed so did his position. Resulting finally in the idea still held by many today that he was a brilliant adolescent who wrote a few youthful masterpieces but deteriorated into a composer of sweet and sentimental little pieces. The critic Derek Cooke not only vehemently denies this but goes on to declare that Mendelssohn was an even more precocious genius and Mozart. He points out that while Mozart composed at 18 Mendelssohn had a great many really fine works to his credit at fourteen.
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Series
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
Episode
Weber, Creston, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff, part 1
Producing Organization
University of Cincinnati
WGUC (Radio station : Cincinnati, Ohio)
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-959c966b
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-959c966b).
Description
Episode Description
This program, the first of four parts, features performances of pieces by Weber, Creston, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff.
Series Description
This series presents performances by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Max Rudolf.
Broadcast Date
1966-03-02
Topics
Music
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:21:13
Credits
Conductor: Rudolf, Max, 1902-1995
Performing Group: Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.
Producing Organization: University of Cincinnati
Producing Organization: WGUC (Radio station : Cincinnati, Ohio)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 66-12-3 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:21:02
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Citations
Chicago: “Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra; Weber, Creston, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff, part 1,” 1966-03-02, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed February 24, 2024, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-959c966b.
MLA: “Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra; Weber, Creston, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff, part 1.” 1966-03-02. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. February 24, 2024. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-959c966b>.
APA: Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra; Weber, Creston, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff, part 1. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-959c966b