thumbnail of Negro music in America; 30
Transcript
Hide -
If this transcript has significant errors that should be corrected, let us know, so we can add it to FIX IT+
Negro music and American. Negro music and American exploration of it and its impact on American culture. Here's your host for the survey's Tony look at Bach ragtime music was called Ragtime because of his reggae a rhythmic nature in a major sense it was probably the general public's first introduction to West African syncopation blended with European musical elements and the nation went wild about it. Cheerful and gay had tickle public fancy after the long depression of the 1890s at the world's fairs in Chicago and St. Louis in about 900 Tin Pan Alley begin to cash in on ragtime and it became a coast to coast sensation circled. Globe and took your advice to harm it went down river to New Orleans and became a part of that miraculous blending that
became traditional jazz. Our first two numbers are from a unique Riverside recording featuring the love Giles ragtime Orchestra of New Orleans both of these numbers are played exactly as written and arranged by the red backed bulk of standard rags by their composers. So here we go. Truly back to the turn of the century to hear first the entertainer read by Scott Joplin and then the West Indies Blues by CNS Williams.
Street bands and jug bands which were often known as spasmed bands played a lot of ragtime and spread its popularity throughout the south. We have a modern version of a jug band. Dave Van Ronk ragtime jug St. Peter's recreating ragtime force into numbers the famous George a camp meeting followed by the St. Louis tickle.
I am. I am. I am. I am.
I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. I am.
I am. I am. I am. I am. I am. And when I am I the only I am.
I am. I am. That I am I am. I am. I am. I am. I am.
Please note: This content is only available at GBH and the Library of Congress, either due to copyright restrictions or because this content has not yet been reviewed for copyright or privacy issues. For information about on location research, click here.
Series
Negro music in America
Episode Number
30
Producing Organization
WSIU 8 (Television station : Carbondale, Ill.)
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-6m335s28
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-6m335s28).
Description
Episode Description
This program, the thirtieth of thirty nine parts, presents various examples of African-American folk and jazz music.
Series Description
This series focuses on music created and performed by African-Americans, including folk, and jazz styles. This series is hosted by Anton Luckenbach of Carbondale, Illinois, who also gathered interviews in New Orleans for this series.
Broadcast Date
1967-06-21
Topics
Music
Race and Ethnicity
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:14:22
Credits
Host: Luckenbach, Anton
Producing Organization: WSIU 8 (Television station : Carbondale, Ill.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 67-1-30 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:14:06
If you have a copy of this asset and would like us to add it to our catalog, please contact us.
Citations
Chicago: “Negro music in America; 30,” 1967-06-21, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed February 7, 2023, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-6m335s28.
MLA: “Negro music in America; 30.” 1967-06-21. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. February 7, 2023. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-6m335s28>.
APA: Negro music in America; 30. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-6m335s28