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<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Ava Belisle-Chatterjee loves a challenge. She's teaching <v Announcer>young science students how to make the grade. <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>Teaching is . . . it's never the same from day to day, from year to year. <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>So you can never say you're bored. <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>And that's really great. <v Announcer>At Sabin Magnet School, science class is a team effort: students and the teacher <v Announcer>finding answers by working together. <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>I want the students to realize that we don't know all the answers, and teachers <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>do not know all the answers. Coming in honestly, not knowing things, <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>makes for a, more of a spirited camaraderie <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>amongst the students and the teachers, I think.
<v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>Well, I'm a teacher, I guess, because I'm a missionary at heart. <v Ava Belisle-Chatterjee>And I have this belief that if I don't do it, who will? <v Announcer>Ava Belisle-Chatterjee is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools. <v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Consuelo Milburn is a fighter, an outstanding teacher, <v Announcer>challenging her students to make the grade. <v Consuelo Milburn>Good morning! <v Students>Good morning! <v Consuelo Milburn>I teach because I love it. I like to effect a change in students,
<v Consuelo Milburn>especially those who seem to feel that they have no hope. <v Consuelo Milburn>And when they come to me, the greatest joy is seeing a glimmer of, of hope in their <v Consuelo Milburn>eyes when they achieve something that they thought they couldn't do. <v Consuelo Milburn>If going through so many failures and they're disgusted with themselves. <v Consuelo Milburn>So along comes an adult that says, "You can do it, I have faith in you." And <v Consuelo Milburn>that gets 'em rolling. That starts the juices boiling, and they move right along. <v Male student>She is really strict. <v Male student>Really strict! And, and, um, sometimes she, she, she is really loving. <v Male student>And I really like her. <v Consuelo Milburn>Our classroom motto is, "We are learning for the serious business of living." <v Consuelo Milburn>I tell them that living is a serious business, you know, and, and that's why we're <v Consuelo Milburn>learning. <v Consuelo Milburn>[speaking to students; students clapping] Give yourselves a nice big hand. <v Announcer>Consuelo Milburn is making the grade in the Chicago <v Announcer>Public Schools.
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag. <v Jennifer, speaking and using sign language>My name is Jennifer, and I am 11 years old. <v Jennifer, speaking and using sign language>And I have been in band for two years, and I play the flute. <v Band instructor>3, 4 . . . [student band begins to play] <v Announcer>Would you put hearing-impaired children in the school band? <v Announcer>At Kinzie Elementary the answer is yes. <v Announcer>It's part of their creative approach to blending a diverse student body. <v Jeri Banks>Our school goal is to create one community here at Kinzie, <v Jeri Banks>where all of the students feel that they can compete on an equal basis and that they <v Jeri Banks>can get along and help each other. <v Jeri Banks>The deaf children are able to participate in all of our programs because we provide <v Jeri Banks>whatever services they need. If they need an interpreter, we have an interpreter. <v Jeri Banks>Uh, all of our classroom teachers sign, and we have some wonderful team-teaching programs <v Jeri Banks>going on. <v Announcer>Parents, teachers, students and the principal working together at Kinzie Elementary. <v Announcer>They're all part of the solution. Kinzie Elementary is making the grade in the Chicago <v Announcer>Public Schools.
<v Connie Jones>[sound of school bell ringing] I started volunteering because my son was starting in <v Connie Jones>kindergarten. And he wouldn't stay without me being with him. <v Connie Jones>Well, I volunteer every day, you know, every day, five days a week, all day. <v Announcer>Because Connie Jones believes in her son's education, she's one of many parent volunteers <v Announcer>sponsored by Encyclopedia Britannica and Von Humboldt Elementary. <v Suzanne Gilford>These moms work yeoman's hours. <v Suzanne Gilford>They tutor in the classroom. They're that extra pair of hands that the teacher needs. <v Suzanne Gilford>They take kids home. They do anything. <v Connie Jones>You know, I hate to stay home and not come to the school. <v Connie Jones>Brighten my day just to be here, you know, just to be here, to <v Connie Jones>help them. <v Announcer>Parent volunteers are making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Ken Klopack teaches confidence with a paint brush. He uses <v Announcer>art to help students make the grade. <v Linda Townson, Funston Elementary>He promotes confidence. Self-esteem. <v Linda Townson, Funston Elementary>He, he tries to, uh, make the children understand that this is you. <v Linda Townson, Funston Elementary>This should be you. Incorporate your, your likenesses and <v Linda Townson, Funston Elementary>differences in your art. <v Ken Klopack>People aren't going to notice them if they're not confident about themselves. <v Ken Klopack>Their family life might not be the best. <v Ken Klopack>They don't have a lot of resources. <v Ken Klopack>So, being confident in themselves, that may be all they have to work <v Ken Klopack>with at first. <v Announcer>In Ken's classroom, feeling good about your artwork can be the first step toward feeling <v Announcer>good about yourself. And that confidence can motivate students to succeed. <v Ken Klopack>I want them to achieve success and then taste it. <v Ken Klopack>Once they taste it, they want more. <v Announcer>A taste of success can truly inspire a student. <v Announcer>Ken Klopack is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools. <v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I please allegiance to the flag--
<v Male student>I got straight A's here. <v Male student>In high school, I had straight F's. <v Male student>So that's a big change. <v Garland Cleggett, principal>Double E is a, is an alternative high school program that's set up <v Garland Cleggett, principal>to address the needs of those students that have been dropped from the regular public <v Garland Cleggett, principal>schools. Ah, the students will go to a 40-week program, <v Garland Cleggett, principal>and they will have the English courses, business, math, computer <v Garland Cleggett, principal>science, and those types of classes that will get them back into their regular <v Garland Cleggett, principal>schools. <v Female student>Here, I got myself back together and brought back that <v Female student>part of me that I really wanted. <v Female student>Then, um my goal to graduate. <v Male student #2>Well, by me going to school now and back on the right track, I'm, I'm feeling real good <v Male student #2>about myself. <v Garland Cleggett, principal>Double E is actually for those young people that have made a commitment <v Garland Cleggett, principal>to move on with their lives and to look at past failures and turn 'em around and become <v Garland Cleggett, principal>successful. <v Announcer>The Double E program is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Doing homework can be a lot easier with the help of <v Announcer>Homework Hotline volunteers. <v Katie Hession, program representative>We have accountants, actuaries. <v Katie Hession, program representative>Ah, we have an engineer. We have a retired gentleman who volunteers his services. <v Katie Hession, program representative>We have a grad student from Northwestern. <v Bob, volunteer>Homework Hotline, this is Bob. OK. <v Bob, volunteer>You need help on history? <v Conni Brown, volunteer>You don't really want to just answer a question for a child because then they can't think <v Conni Brown, volunteer>for themselves. So, you want to give them hints or ask some questions. <v Conni Brown, volunteer>Ask them a lot of questions that they have to answer. And that way, without realizing it, <v Conni Brown, volunteer>they're answering their own homework questions. <v Female volunteer>Do you divide or do you multiply? <v Female volunteer>Think about it, Danielle. <v Katie Hession, program representative>We ask volunteers to help out at least one night a week. <v Katie Hession, program representative>That's three hours: from 5 to 8, Monday through Thursday. <v Conni Brown, volunteer>It's really rewarding when a child understands their homework after you've helped them. <v Announcer>Homework Hotline: helping Chicago students make the grade.
<v Shelley Spencer>Hi, I'm Shelley Spencer. School reform in Chicago is getting nationwide attention <v Shelley Spencer>because quality education is a priority for us all. <v Shelley Spencer>For public education to work, we all need to be involved. <v Shelley Spencer>So over the coming year, WTTW is undertaking an important project we call "Making <v Shelley Spencer>the Grade." To keep you informed on what's happening in the schools, our regular <v Shelley Spencer>programming, along with specials and documentaries, will probe critical reform issues. <v Shelley Spencer>From "Chicago Tonight" to regular one-minute reports on public-school successes, watch <v Shelley Spencer>Channel 11. We'll be watching the schools.
<v Katrina Thorson>Hi, I'm Katrina Thorson. <v Katrina Thorson>School reform in Chicago is getting nationwide attention because quality education is <v Katrina Thorson>a priority for us all. For public education to work, we all need to be <v Katrina Thorson>involved. So over the coming year, WTTW is undertaking an important project <v Katrina Thorson>we call "Making the Grade." To keep you informed on what's happening in the schools, <v Katrina Thorson>our regular programing, along with specials and documentaries, will probe <v Katrina Thorson>critical reform issues. From "Chicago Tonight" to regular one-minute reports <v Katrina Thorson>on public-school successes, watch Channel Eleven. <v Katrina Thorson>We'll be watching the schools.
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag-- <v Pamela James, local school council chair>Local school councils enable a school to develop programs specifically <v Pamela James, local school council chair>geared for the success of that particular school. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>It's local management of schools. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>Of course, there are several components that go into making a good school. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>One of them is, uh, the leadership that is provided. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>Secondly is to make sure that everyone is working toward <v Pamela James, local school council chair>the same common goal so that we expect the principal to learn <v Pamela James, local school council chair>from the teachers, the teachers to learn from the students, as well as the students <v Pamela James, local school council chair>learning from the teachers. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>We often refer to ourselves as the Whitney Young family. <v Pamela James, local school council chair>I think other parents would feel the same way, should they become <v Pamela James, local school council chair>involved in their particular school. <v Announcer>This local school council is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Combining drafting and geometry can help math students <v Announcer>make the grade. <v Male teacher #1>We're gonna continue working on the five regular solids, and just like in this old house, <v Male teacher #1>remember: measure twice cut once. <v Announcer>At Bowen High School, students use drafting and build models to reinforce what <v Announcer>they learn in geometry class. <v Male teacher #2>The students really enjoy the hands-on applications. <v Male teacher #2>When they come into the class, they are relating theory <v Male teacher #2>that they've learned in geometry and applying it, uh, in a, a drafting <v Male teacher #2>class. <v Female student>I'm not really a geometry lover. But since I have drafting to go along with it, it's much <v Female student>better. My grades have come up, too. <v Male teacher #2>We teach these students to, um, use drafting tools <v Male teacher #2>to construct geometric figures. <v Male teacher #1>Ah, the students like the program. They do well in the program. <v Male teacher #1>And their geometry grades have improved. <v Announcer>A creative math program is making the grade in the Chicago Public <v Announcer>Schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] At Tilton Elementary, an Afrocentric curriculum is <v Announcer>inspiring students to make the grade. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>[African song plays] The Afrocentric curriculum is the curriculum that's designed to make <v Wanda Washington, teacher>the students aware of the contributions of African Americans. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>Because the idea of the Afrocentric curriculum is not to do away with the present program <v Wanda Washington, teacher>that we have, but to supplement it, to add to it. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>[addressing classroom: "Everybody."/students reply] I think that the one thing that we <v Wanda Washington, teacher>have to realize is that when African-American children, they've missed an integral <v Wanda Washington, teacher>part of the educational process, when we teach Bach and Beethoven <v Wanda Washington, teacher>and we don't teach Duke Ellington and Count Basie. <v Announcer>The local school council aims to improve student performance and self-esteem through <v Announcer>their Afrocentric curriculum. <v Jesse Moore, principal>We just think that this is, this [just] couldn't help but make a, uh, make a difference <v Jesse Moore, principal>in, uh, in, in, in, what the children are trying to do and what we're trying to do for <v Jesse Moore, principal>them. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>It's a brand new learning experience, you know. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>And I just think, I'm excited about teaching it. <v Wanda Washington, teacher>So I, I'm pretty sure that they're excited about learning.
<v Announcer>A multicultural curriculum is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools. <v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag-- <v Brigid Gerace>I am a teacher because I really do want to, uh, help the children
<v Brigid Gerace>enjoy learning before someone turns them off. <v Brigid Gerace>And I have a wonderful time teaching. And I learn all the time. <v Brigid Gerace>I think someone said, what? "Teaching is learning twice." <v Announcer>Brigid Gerace loves to teach and her students make it fun. <v Brigid Gerace>I think students inspire me. If I come in and my energy level isn't <v Brigid Gerace>where it usually is, I just have to take a look at them and just watch them and watch <v Brigid Gerace>them begin to get excited. It's contagious. <v Brigid Gerace>I love working with kids who, every year, get more and more interesting. <v Brigid Gerace>And watching the kids, who I've had in class before, <v Brigid Gerace>grow and try new things and be risk-takers <v Brigid Gerace>and not operate from a fear base, to know that they <v Brigid Gerace>really can accomplish. And they do. <v Brigid Gerace>And to watch them year after year is just incredible. <v Announcer>Teaching the joy of learning is making the grade in the Chicago public schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Cheryl Watkins uses special methods to teach children with <v Announcer>autism,. <v Cheryl Watkins>The way that I reach the children is through a lot of hands-on activities. <v Cheryl Watkins>[sound of Vanilla Ice's "Ice, Ice, Baby" playing] I really try to bombard them with <v Cheryl Watkins>touches and, and hugs and, and things like that. <v Cheryl Watkins>Um, I'd create a very individualized program so <v Cheryl Watkins>that each child's needs are met. <v Cheryl Watkins>I'm trying to help create a more typical, <v Cheryl Watkins>a more normal, individual in each and every child. <v Cheryl Watkins>And by doing that, I want to draw out their strengths, <v Cheryl Watkins>things that they like to do, things that are gonna help make them successful in life. <v Announcer>Reaching children with autism is challenging, but can provide tremendous rewards. <v Cheryl Watkins>Some days I cry. Some days, you know, I just have to hold them and <v Cheryl Watkins>hug them until they squirm away because they don't want me touching them. <v Cheryl Watkins>But once it is, once they get something, they really have <v Cheryl Watkins>it. And that's the best part. <v Announcer>Cheryl Watkins is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] Bilingual education encourages Spanish- and English-speaking <v Announcer>students to make the grade. <v Ana Bensinger>Interamerican was the, it was the dream of two parents who wanted their children to <v Ana Bensinger>become bilingual and bicultural and multicultural. <v Ana Bensinger>We teach these subjects in Spanish and in English. <v Ana Bensinger>Here at the preschool level, and actually the kindergarten and first grade too, we do <v Ana Bensinger>immersion. We do, we teach in Spanish because to be bilingual is an asset. <v Ana Bensinger>It, it's not a handicap. <v Announcer>[teacher speaks spanish to students] Ana Bensinger helps her students feel good about <v Announcer>themselves by celebrating their cultural heritage. <v Ana Bensinger>We have a very important job. We need bilingual teachers. <v Ana Bensinger>We need good bilingual teachers. And we, we need role models for the children. <v Ana Bensinger>If I could only inspire one person to become a bilingual teacher, I would be very happy. <v Announcer>Bilingual education is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag-- <v Patricia Bearden>I'm like a salesman: I, I sell education, I sell ideas, and I sell the joy <v Patricia Bearden>of learning. <v Carlton Lee, student>She's my favorite teacher because we do many things, right, <v Carlton Lee, student>about our culture and learn about different cultures and ethnic <v Carlton Lee, student>groups. <v Patricia Bearden>A lot of my children do not appreciate who they are and accept who they are. <v Patricia Bearden>And my number one challenge is to get them to trust me, to bond with me, so <v Patricia Bearden>we can get on with the business of learning and to become lifelong learners. <v Anna Dickerson, parent>She has a way of reaching sort of inside the children <v Anna Dickerson, parent>to pull out more than just the academic accomplishments and success. <v Anna Dickerson, parent>She takes and develops the character that comes in the room. <v Patricia Bearden>We have a poem that we say every day, and that's "Keep a-going." [students chanting in <v Patricia Bearden>unison: "Keep on going! Keep on going!"]
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag of the-- <v Elsa Gonzalez>To me, an effective teacher has to be like the night. <v Elsa Gonzalez>You have to be very dark. <v Elsa Gonzalez>Very inobtrusive. You have to be on the sideline, and you have to let the real stars come <v Elsa Gonzalez>out. And the real stars are the children. <v Elsa Gonzalez>A lot of them are very intimidated because this is a brand new situation <v Elsa Gonzalez>to them. They are new to the country. <v Elsa Gonzalez>They don't know the language. <v Elsa Gonzalez>They feel totally insecure. And the first thing, the biggest <v Elsa Gonzalez>first obstacle I have to overcome, is the language barrier. <v Elsa Gonzalez>[speaking spanish to students] How do you say it in English? <v Students>Numerator. <v Elsa Gonzalez>Numerator! Good, Daisy! <v Elsa Gonzalez>I think the biggest reward I have in teaching is that every day <v Elsa Gonzalez>when I go to sleep, I think, a new mind <v Elsa Gonzalez>opened up. I didn't open it. <v Elsa Gonzalez>They did it themselves, but I was there for the event. <v Announcer>Elsa Gonzalez is making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag of the-- <v Diane Maciejewski>In Edgebrook, we're not afraid to dream, <v Diane Maciejewski>dream big, and work hard to make those dreams come true. <v Diane Maciejewski>The bustling science lab that we have today was not here three years ago. <v Diane Maciejewski>Instead, we had a room that was filled with junk. <v Diane Maciejewski>Another dream come true is our gymnastics team. <v Diane Maciejewski>The next big dream is to take this musty, dusty, outdated library <v Diane Maciejewski>and turn it into a state-of-the-art Learning Resource Center. <v Diane Maciejewski>When this area is completed, teachers will have at their fingertips the materials <v Diane Maciejewski>they need to be creative, to make their lessons come alive, <v Diane Maciejewski>and to encourage students to think and learn independently.
<v Diane Maciejewski>We really believe that we have the expertise here at our school, and <v Diane Maciejewski>our staff, to do what we have to do. <v Diane Maciejewski>And with the support of our parents and with the community, that is very generous, we get <v Diane Maciejewski>done what we need to get done. <v Announcer>Realizing dreams of making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools. <v Announcer>[sound of school bell ringing] A baseball program designed to interest students in <v Announcer>geography is making the grade. [sound of John Fogerty's "Centerfield" begins to play] As <v Announcer>part of the Adopt a School program, corporate volunteers come on a weekly basis to lead
<v Announcer>the game at Agassiz Elementary. <v Kim Wright, corporate volunteer>It's just been fun being involved in teaching process and helping. <v Kim Wright, corporate volunteer>Even if it is one school a time, there's an increasing awareness of geography in a fun, <v Kim Wright, corporate volunteer>healthy way. <v Male student>Well, a person asks you to find something, uh, of the United States on the map <v Male student>and you use a hand, left to right hand. <v Male student>And you go up to the map and you try to find it. <v Male student>And then there's a single, a double, and a triple, and you can get <v Male student>a home run. <v Debbie Brown>I absolutely think my students' knowledge of geography has improved. <v Debbie Brown>Ah, when they started, they just knew the Chicago area. <v Debbie Brown>And now they know places all around the world. <v Male student>I like the game because it's fun. <v Kim Wright, corporate volunteer>Alright, timess up! And the winner of today's game is the Aces. <v Kim Wright, corporate volunteer>[children cheer] <v Announcer>Geography baseball is a real hit in the Chicago public schools.
<v Teacher and students>[sound of school bell ringing] I pledge allegiance to the flag of the-- <v Announcer>On Chicago's West Side, art, dance, and music have found a home at the Howland School for <v Announcer>the Arts. <v Speaker>[drummers play in sync to horns; woodwinds play; students dance to samba music; young girl plays flute; students discuss using tape for project; young students work with paper and <v Speaker>glue; brass horns play in sync to drums; students laugh while pressing hands into paint; young girl plays flute again: she finishes, smiles, and hands clap] <v Announcer>Art programs are making the grade in the Chicago Public Schools.
Series
Making the Grade
Episode
Making the Grade Minutes
Producing Organization
Public Broadcasting Service (U.S.)
WTTW (Television station : Chicago, Ill.)
Contributing Organization
The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia (Athens, Georgia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip-526-wp9t14vx75
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip-526-wp9t14vx75).
Description
Episode Description
This collection of informational profiles features the following individuals, programs, and institutions: science teacher Ava Belisle-Chatterjee of Sabin Magnet School; Consuelo Milburn of Charles W. Earle Elementary School; John H. Kinzie Elementary School and Jeri Banks; parent volunteer Connie Jones and Suzanne Gilford of Alexander Von Humboldt Elementary School; art teacher Ken Klopack and Linda Townson of Funston Elementary School; alternative high school program Double E, student participants, and principal Garland Cleggett; Homework Hotline, program representative Katie Hession, and volunteer Conni Brown; Shelley Spencer; Katrina Sarson; Pamela James, local school council chair at Whitney M. Young Magnet School; James H. Bowen High School's drafting/geometry program; George W. Tilton Elementary School's Afrocentric curriculum, teacher Wanda Washington, and principal Jesse Moore; Brigid Gerace of Franklin Fine Arts Center; Cheryl Watkins, autism specialist at Louis A. Agassiz Elementary School; Inter-American Magnet School's bilingual program and teacher Ana Bensinger; teacher Patricia Bearden, student Carlton Lee, and parent Anna Dickerson at Ralph H. Metcalfe Community Academy; ESL teacher Elsa Gonzalez at John James Audubon Elementary School; Diane Maciejewski of Edgebrook Elementary School; Kim Wright of Bayer, Bess, Vanderwarker and geography teacher Debbie Brown at Louis A. Agassiz Elementary School; Howland Elementary School for the Arts; the Efficacy program and principal Charles Nelson at Daniel Hale Williams Elementary School.
Series Description
"MAKING THE GRADE was a year-long, ongoing project of WTTW/Chicago aimed at showing the range of existing approaches to the education crisis, including the need for citizen involvement in school reform. "In 1991, MAKING THE GRADE included SHOPPING FOR SCHOOLS, SCHOOL REFORM: ALL POWER TO THE PARENTS', TEACH ME!, and individual profiles of people who make a difference in education called MAKING THE GRADE MINUTES. Also incorporated into the series was a special edition of Chicago's weekly forum for independent producers, IMAGE UNION. "SHOPPING FOR SCHOOLS explores the national issue of 'educational choice,' with education experts and representatives of communities in which working choice plans are in place. SCHOOL REFORM: ALL POWER TO THE PARENTS? follows members of the local school councils as they work through their first year of this new system in school reform. TEACH ME! introduces viewers to new concepts in educational research and to teachers who are implementing them in the classroom. The IMAGE UNION SPECIAL featured videos shot by high school students about their perceptions of school and of the issue of school reform."--1991 Peabody Awards entry form.
Broadcast Date
1991
Asset type
Episode
Media type
Moving Image
Duration
00:32:51.937
Embed Code
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Credits
Producing Organization: Public Broadcasting Service (U.S.)
Producing Organization: WTTW (Television station : Chicago, Ill.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia
Identifier: cpb-aacip-8845478e528 (Filename)
Format: U-matic
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Citations
Chicago: “Making the Grade; Making the Grade Minutes,” 1991, The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 26, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-wp9t14vx75.
MLA: “Making the Grade; Making the Grade Minutes.” 1991. The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 26, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-wp9t14vx75>.
APA: Making the Grade; Making the Grade Minutes. Boston, MA: The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-wp9t14vx75