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This is Latino USA, the Radio Journal of News and Culture. I'm Maria Hinojosa. Today on Latino USA, the US Mexico border comes to the nation's capital. We're breaking a lot of preconceived ideas, a lot of biases that perhaps have been most influenced by the media. And remembering singer, actor, lover, I could not believe the outpour of fans that came to pay their respects to to love. There were thousands and thousands of people waiting on line just to get in. And the voices of young playwrights, they're not all happy plays that happy endings. But we're not trying to say that the whole world is terrible. You know, that everything's terrible, that there's no hope for anything. That's all coming up on Latino USA. But first Noticias, this is news from Latino USA. I'm Maria Martin. Bienvenidos to America, where history was made in Tucson, Arizona, when 76
Latino immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens in a ceremony conducted mostly in Spanish, the English only groups that attack the ceremony as unpatriotic. But Tucson immigration officials ruled it complied with laws allowing immigrants over the age of 50 in this country over 20 years to take citizenship tests in their native language. The law only requires that the oath of allegiance to the United States be taken in English or anything else is permissible in another language. We thought it was only right that we do it there in their language so they can understand the experience. Before the full ceremony nationwide, as many as six million Latino legal residents are eligible for U.S. citizenship. The seizure of a number of Florida based vessels in Cuban waters, including one incident in which three people reportedly lost their lives, has focused attention on the increasingly dangerous and lucrative business of smuggling people from that island. Emilio Sampedro reports. This year alone, more than 1100 Cubans have been rescued off the Florida coast by the
U.S. Coast Guard. Many of these have received help from smugglers in the U.S. In some cases, these smugglers have reportedly earned up to ten thousand dollars for smuggling refugees out of Cuba. Damian Fernandez of Florida International University says that in addition to the for profit operations, there are also many cases of families trying to help their relatives leave Cuba. These operations break both Cuban law and U.S. law as well as international law. One of their consequences is that they. Jeopardize and feed the fire and the tension between the United States and Cuba. So far, seven U.S. residents have been arrested by the Cuban government. Only one has been identified as a U.S. citizen by the State Department for Latino USA. I'm Emilio Sampedro. The recent murder of a Roman Catholic cardinal in Guadalajara, Mexico, is being linked to a gang of San Diego. Law enforcement officials say at least six members of the Treinta Gang were the
hired killers for Tijuana drug cartel, led by the Ramon Arellano family from San Diego. Maria Elena has more. Cazenave say Posadas, Ocampo and six other persons were accidentally killed when gunmen hired by a Tijuana drug cartel mistakenly opened fire on the cardinal's limousine. Law enforcement officials say that members of the Gayathri the gang were hired by the L.A. brothers to kill a rival drug lord, Joaquin El Chapo Guzman. Guzman was believed to be the target when Cardinal Posadas was shot last May 24th for Latino USA. I'm Maria Elena in San Diego. You're listening to news from Latino USA. It may not be election time, but Democrats and Republicans are wooing Latinos. In a briefing held for the Hispanic press in Washington, Democratic National Committee Chair David Wilhelm announced a salute Pareto's campaign to win Hispanic support for the president's health care plan and also a major drive
to increase Latino voter participation. We are going to be very much involved in encouraging citizenship and encouraging participation among that new huge voting bloc. Meanwhile, several recent press reports say it's the Republicans who are making inroads among traditionally Democratic Latino voters. Cited are results of exit polls done in November by the Southwest Voter Research Institute in San Antonio. But institute director Robert Prasetyo says the press reports misconstrue the data about Latino voter preferences. There certainly was a change in party identification among Latinos that showed up on our exit polls both in California and Texas. But the shift was a decline in identification with either of the two major parties and an increase in independents. Independents more than doubled. Now, about one in four Latino voters are independent. Rasheda also says recent electoral victories by Republicans in Texas and California,
Kay Bailey Hutchison for the Senate and Richard Riordan for L.A. mayor had less to do with increased Latino support than with more Anglos coming out to vote and with greater polarization between Anglos and Latinos and other minorities along party lines in Latino politics is still pretty much controlled by the Democrats. But it certainly could change. And I think that it depends a lot on the extent to which the parties make an effort to run Latino candidates and address Latino issues. Robert Briscoe of the Southwest Voter Research Institute and Maria Martin with news from Latino USA. I'm Maria Hinojosa. On the Fourth of July at the Spanish Colonial Governor's Palace in San Juan,
Puerto Rico's statehood, governor Pedro Rosario signed a bill which calls for a plebiscite to be held this November to decide Puerto Rico's political future. With us on the phone from San Juan to talk about what this latest step means for Puerto Rico is political analyst Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua. It seems that the Puerto Rican people are forever voting on or debating or talking about whether they want to be a state, remain a commonwealth or be granted their independence. Now, is there anything different about the process that began with Pedro? Rosa, you're the governor's latest effort. No one is the first time ever that a statehood government controls the executive, both chambers of the legislature with an ample majority and 60 of the 78 municipalities in the island. In other words, this is the first time, again, since 1898 in which statehood is obviously the possible winner of a plebiscite in Puerto Rico.
The second thing is that after Congress failed to implement the US oriented plebiscite, which died in the Senate two years ago, the United States has to. Get its act together to respond to what unilaterally the people of Puerto Rico are going to say on the 14th of November of this year, I have said in my column in The Miami Herald that this is the moment in which finally the irresistible force meets the immovable object. So what happens with the US Congress when they get the decision on November 14th of what the Puerto Rican people decide? What role does the US Congress have to play this time? What's happening at this point is that Congressman Serrano, a Puerto Rican from New York, has introduced a resolution that will be discussed in the House Interior Committee that, in effect, does two things. No one recognizes the right of the people of Puerto Rico to self-determination.
And No. Two, commits the Congress to respond to the expression of the will of the people of Puerto Rico so that the people of Puerto Rico will next year know exactly what the reaction of the Congress has been to whatever wins in November of this year. Now, Juan Manuel, the fact is, is that Puerto Rico has been struggling with this issue for many years. It's an island where we've had Spanish declared the official language at times. Other times, English has been taught forcibly in the schools. That's right. Can Puerto Rico, in fact, become the first state of the United States? And how does that look in the future? Well, the statehood movement itself, Maria, has announced that only one senator, Senator Paul Simon of Illinois, has already committed himself to submit enabling legislation if statehood is voted on by the people. On the other hand, my own polls
of the Senate indicate that 29 senators will oppose the granting of statehood offhand and from the very beginning. So here we have a very lopsided thing. I mean, we already have 29 names that will oppose statehood, only one that will favored. But I think that, you know, the issue is not really whether state will be granted or not, the issue is that the Sphinx will be forced to speak, that the Senate will, in effect, respond and take a position on the admission of Puerto Rico to the State of the Union as muchas gracias. Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua, a columnist for the Miami Herald and a political commentator in Puerto Rico. Muchas gracias, Juanma. Hollywood movies and television commercials often give us quick, concise
images of people and places along the US Mexico border going beyond those media made notions towards real understanding is difficult, even impossible, without first hand contact in the nation's capital. There was an attempt to go beyond those media images of the border. It was part of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife. But as Frank Contreras reports from Washington, real cultural understanding required more than a taste of border foods or the sounds of border music. Some young guys from Mexicali were standing in a crowd between the Capitol Building and the Washington Monument, they wore baggy pants, some had dark glasses and others headbands pulled way down low. To some people, they looked like gangsters, but they're not their cello's with a distinctive style of dress that comes straight from the border. Suddenly, they started speaking Spanish out loud when
the Border Patrol got through here every day. Let's take our clothes out and get out from behind a food stand with some beans we're cooking. A guy came out wearing all white with a pointed hood, Klan style. Now, it was the Border Patrol chasing down one of the people watching, realized it was a play by a theater group from a Hickley, a border town south of California. The actors were hitting one of the main issues on the border, immigration. Their translator is Kiki Aviles. Know a lot of people complain that they don't understand because the show is being done in Spanish. But at the same time, you know, that's what life is, you know? Well, Latinos come here. We don't understand either. So, you know, we're talking about that last night. It's sort of like returning. A woman walked past us dressed like the Virgin of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico. She went past a display where a man was making guitars by hand past a group of murals from El Paso who were painting an eagle and over to a food stand
where a black woman who speaks only Spanish was serving tamales and they got a beer. And next to her was a woman from Texas. We're breaking a lot of preconceived ideas, so a lot of biases that perhaps have been most influenced by the media. Cynthia February teaches at the Southwestern Borderlands Cultural Studies and Research Center in Kingsville, Texas. She says the American Folklife Festival in Washington is an opportunity not only for people who've never seen the border, but also for people who've come here from the border to share their cultures. The rest of the world perceives this is what the media makes us out to be, the movies, the news. And they're really thrilled to have a chance to say, this is who we are. We are living, breathing human beings that have the same ease as you do. We just take care of those things in a slightly different fashion. That sounds fairly straightforward. And some people walked away from here with more understanding about the people of the borderlands, but not without some effort. At one display, Romy Frias of El Paso was trying to explain to some people from Delaware what a low rider is, you know, a highly stylized car, usually an older model
with small, thin tires, maybe a mural painted on the hood and lowered about an inch from the pavement, tell people that it's really going to mess you up. You're doing about 55 and there's just monster pothole and you've got about an inch clearance, about a lot of friends that face that situation and unfortunately had to learn the hard way. Later, under a shaded area, there was a storytelling session. It was supposed to be about women on the border. An Indian woman from the Mexican side sat on the left. On the right was a white woman who works for the U.S. Border Patrol in the middle of the two women, said a university professor, he was monopolizing the discussion. Then, at another storytelling session about immigration, the professor was taking over again. Some people in the back were saying it was typical. Here's this white male, the expert not letting the others talk. After the session, I went over to him and learned his name is Enrique Madrid, a man of mixed races whose family migrated to the Americas from France and Spain. Like many others along the border, his family goes back generations.
Now, Madrid says he saw many surprised people at the folk fest who learned of the amazing cultural diversity along the border. I mean, just the amazement that you can see in people's faces when they encounter these two black women over here from the from the black Seminole community. They are they are Mexicans. So this is these are really these are really complex cultural entities, complex, like the land where they live. The border is often characterized by clashing cultural forces that Madrid says people living on the border cross the international boundary daily. But it's no big deal because it's part of their daily life. And he said the people living along the 2000 miles separating line did not come to the border. It came to them. Then he mentioned a series of treaties between the U.S. and Mexico dating back to the late 1980s. It's a complex history, a balancing act, he says, because the needs of border people compete with the national needs of Washington and Mexico City. And the result of that struggle is border culture.
But culture isn't isn't in your blood culture is something that you that you learn culture, culture and identities are things that are negotiated and and forged every day of our lives as we live our lives out in specific areas of the country. La Madrid told me about a sewer line that broke during the festival Sunday morning. Smelly, dark sewer water flooded a small area around some of the exhibits. He and the others said it reminded them of some border towns where pollution has become a major problem. But on the day the sewer broke, people taking part in the American Folklife Festival this year continued their efforts to share their life's experiences as the smell and humidity surrounded them for Latino USA and Frank Contreras in Washington. Ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba.
Esperanza or hope it said that's one thing young people living in this day and age often lack. But in San Antonio, Texas, a group of teenagers is creating theater that expresses a measure of hope for the future, even admits the reality of drugs, gangs, identity, questions and homelessness. Along with Lucy Edwards, Latino USA is Maria Martin prepared this report group Anonymous. It's the Friday afternoon at Fox Technical High School in San Antonio. Young members of the acting troupe and a group of animal ages 13 to 18 have come together to start rehearsing their new production. The group's name derives from the Spanish word, meaning spirit, energy and a desire to inspire. And the drama they're preparing is written and performed by the kids themselves. All the young women and the people over here identity, the drama and production is called I Have Hopes, Hopes
That Keeps Sacred in My Soul. It's a series of vignettes, tales of young people, much like the members of a group or animal facing life's challenges and learning to cope. It's about a young girl who gets pregnant and she has to tell her parents, because both of us know so many girls who have already gotten pregnant and it's it's not looking better or anything. So I'm 17 years old and I wrote about the homeless. So much we can learn from our people. They've gone through rough times. And by that, a lot of them are on the streets and we don't even care about them. I decided to bring up the issue of teenage homosexuality because Hispanic, Mexican-American families, it's hard. It's harder for them to deal with it. There's a lot of tradition and a lot of the tradition is built around the male role model and female role model. And 14 year old Mikaela Diaz, along with Guadalupe Escovedo and Victoria Rivera, are among the nine playwrights who make up a little boy anymore.
Sixteen year old Priscilla Wyatt wrote about a young gang member dealing with the pressures of being tied to his gang, but then wanting to get out and be free and lead the life that he wants to lead that the gang doesn't allow him to. Yeah, you don't understand. Well, what if they come after me? They know I live. They're tearing you apart. They mess around with people's lives like it's nothing. You can't be afraid to be who you are. Don't keep it down forever. I hate them. You know, it's really a lot of what's going on in their minds and in their lives, but they never have a place to talk about it. Director George Emilio Sanchez of New York is working with a young playwrights and actors of a group anymore. It takes a lot of courage to be a young person, takes a hell of a lot of courage to say, yeah, I'm I'm young, I don't know everything, and I want to be alive. That, to me is like heroic. I think individually, if you read the things they write, no, I don't think they have a lot of hope, but still see the kids.
Their stories do express hope as the title of their collective work indicates. Even though we're sad and depressed about it. I think there's always that that bright side and that hope that we have. And that's just what the hope is about. That's why I think that the name of it I have hope so I keep sacred in my soul is what we're using. They're not all happy place with happy endings, but we're not trying to say that the whole world is terrible, you know, that everything's terrible, that there's no hope for anything, even though we know what reality is, you know, we still feel that there can be a change. You know, that there will be a change. And if anybody will be the ones who do that, and that's our message. Basically a group of animals production of I have hopes, hopes that keeps sacred in My Soul runs through July 17th at San Antonio's Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center. The center's theater director, Europeana, calls the troupe the next generation of Chicano theater estrus for Latino USA, with Lucy Edwards in San Antonio Amaria Martin.
Ecolabel, one of salsa's superstars known worldwide as El Cantante, its contents and the Latin Sinatra died in New York City June 29 after a lifetime of music and tragedy. Thousands poured into the streets at his funeral in New York. Fans and musicians, they all came to pay tribute to actor level from New York. Mandalit del Barco prepared this remembrance of a salsa legend. OK, Hector Lavoe was known to his fans as El Cantante, the most contentious and so Netto, the local Nettos, the singer of Singer Mayhem. But they don't make it out yet in order to go on stage with Willie Golan's band and with his own orchestra. He would often urged the crowds to join him in celebrating the people of Latin America, hinting he called them my people.
He had a clear voice, Hector style, beauty, bedelia voice diction was very clear. Quatro player Yoma. Tauto remembers being in Willie Colon's band with Hector Lavoe, who used to proudly call himself Barberot, a hick from Puerto Rico. Hitler was a boy they used to love to be with would be poor people. He don't mess with their beaks, you know, society, you know, he go for that too much. You know, sometimes he jörg improvising. Sometimes he came became serious, improvising the town El Pueblo love it very much. So Ecto was like an idol to the people. Even Labus reputation for making his fans wait for hours didn't affect his popularity, didn't start up in the night. I had to show up about twelve o'clock, two hours after, you know, people was there waiting for Hector and the band was playing along. And I hate to think they started screaming so very happy. And they forget about he came late and anyway would be word that he
used to say all his words. He's not that I came late because the reason is that you came to. I want to go back in a moment when I found out Hector Lavoe was born Hector one Betties into a musical family of singers and born in Puerto Rico in 1946, when he was barely six years old, he would sit by the radio shouting out his battle songs with singers like Daniel Santos and to we told them I am one. Eventually, he left for New York and was soon discovered by Johnny Pacheco of Fania Records, who teamed up with Willie Colon. Pianist Joe Torez worked with Hector Lavoe for 25 years first, and Willie Colon's band then level its own orchestra. When he was a good guy to work with. You know, he would come in and do a party you always enjoyed playing. That's one thing you did. You looked at his best cars will have you on the stage. Percussionist Milton Cardona remembers how crazy the stage shows could get.
Like one New Year's Eve gig actor comes out and says, well, the queen of welfare just anxious to, you know, to play the movie. I started a riot before. We know we have on the bandstand fighting off just about every guy in that club. I mean, it was like the Alamo. And that's when he got his jaw broken, when he got knocked out unconscious. That was another good night to hear one. Former Latin New York magazine publisher Izzy Sanabria wrote a biography of Lovo for a new compilation disc. But all of a sudden he was he was a nobody and boom immediately made it. And all this attention was too much for him, he says. While the voice of life in the streets of Puerto Rico, in New York, his own life was filled with tragedies. Well, his mother died when he was quite young, as far as his brother died as a drug addict on the streets of New York, his 17 year old son got killed by accident. The gunshot, his mother in law was found stabbed to
death in her apartment. I mean, it's just, you know, his house burned down, you know, all kinds of stuff that, you know, I think when he jumped, supposedly jumped out of a window in Puerto Rico by Puerto Rico, I mean, that was probably some of the stuff that he couldn't take anymore. I mean, you know, he just went through a lot of stuff. Lavone never quite recovered from his 1988 suicide attempt and his drug addiction. He spent his last years in hospitals with an amputated leg and living with AIDS. Laveau was in the hospital listening to a radio tribute to his life and music when he suffered the first of two heart attacks that finally killed him. After hearing of his old friends death, Willie Colon said all of Latin America cried for the hero of poor people. He called himself a martyr, a monster we helped create. Forgive us, Hector, he wrote in the statement from Spain. Zendo Macchiarini will be the one go for it. I know Mayara. Your going read up Nancy Rodrigues,
co-host of New York's WBAY radio show Conserver Latino, aired a tribute to level after his death. She was also at his wake. I could not believe the the outpour of fans that came to pay their respects to the level. It was to me like going to the parade of Puerto Rican Day Parade with thousands and thousands of people waiting on line just to get in with Puerto Rican flags. They were carrying flowers, everything that represented Puerto Rican. The funeral procession wound its way through the barrio in the Bronx for almost three hours before getting to the cemetery. Surrounded by fans. And true to form, Hector Lavoe was even linked to his own burial. He might have said it wasn't that he was late, but the death came too early for Latino USA. Mandalit del Barco in New York.
And for this week, DePodesta, the Semana, this has been Latino USA, the Radio Journal of News and Culture, Latino USA is produced and edited by Maria Milia. Martin, the associate producer, is on Haleakala. We had help this week from Vidal Guzman Ilibagiza, that John Gharial and Neal Rousch Latino USA is produced at the studios of Kut in Austin, Texas. The technical producer is Walter Morgan. We want to hear from you. So why don't you call us on our toll free number? It's one 800 five three five five five three three. That's one 800 five three five five five three three. Major funding for Latino USA comes from the Ford Foundation, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the University of Texas at Austin. Yes, Della Proxima until next time. I'm Maria Hinojosa for Latino USA.
Cattle stations Maria Martin with a modular segment for this week's edition of Latino USA segment number one one three minutes, 59 seconds. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Puerto Rican political analyst Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua about Governor Pedro Rosales recent signing of a bill calling for a plebiscite in November to decide the island's future political status. The suggested lead in three to one on the 4th of July, Puerto Rico's pro statehood governor Pedro Rosario, signed a bill which calls for a plebiscite to be held this November to decide the island's political future. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa talks to political analyst Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua about what this latest step means for Puerto Rico. It seems that the Puerto Rican people are forever voting on or debating or talking about whether they want to be a state, remain a commonwealth or be granted their independence. Now, is there anything different about the process that began with Pedro? You're the governor's latest effort.
No. One, it's the first time ever that a pro statehood government controls the executive, both chambers of the legislature with an ample majority and 60 of the 78 municipalities in the island. In other words, this is the first time, again, since 1898 in which statehood is obviously the possible winner of a plebiscite in Puerto Rico. The second thing is that after Congress failed to implement a US oriented plebiscite which died in the Senate two years ago, the United States has to. Get its act together to respond to what unilaterally the people of Puerto Rico are going to say on the 14th of November of this year, I have said in my column in The Miami Herald that this is the moment in which finally the irresistible force meets the movable object. So what happens with the US Congress when they get the decision on November
14th of what the Puerto Rican people decide? What role does the US Congress have to play this time? What's happening at this point is that Congressman Serrano, a Puerto Rican from New York, has introduced a resolution that will be discussed in the House Interior Committee that, in effect, does two things. No one recognizes the right of the people of Puerto Rico to self-determination and number, to commit the Congress to respond to the expression of the will of the people of Puerto Rico so that the people of Puerto Rico will next year know exactly what the reaction of the Congress has been to whatever wins in November of this year. Now, Juan Manuel, the fact is, is that Puerto Rico has been struggling with this issue for many years. It's an island where we've had Spanish declared the official language at times. Other times, English has been taught forcibly in the schools. That's right. Can Puerto Rico, in fact, become the first state
of the United States? And how does that look in the future? Well, the statehood movement itself, Maria, has announced that only one senator, Senator Paul Simon of Illinois, has already committed himself to submit enabling legislation if statehood is voted on by the people. On the other hand, my own polls of the Senate indicate that 29 senators will oppose the granting of statehood offhand and from the very beginning. So here we have a very lopsided thing. I mean, we already have 29 names that will oppose statehood, only one that will favored. But I think that, you know, the issue is not really whether states will be granted or not, the issue is that the Sphinx will be forced to speak, that the Senate will, in effect, respond and take a position on the admission of Puerto Rico, the State of the Union, with muchas gracias. Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua, a columnist for the Miami Herald and a political
commentator in Puerto Rico. Muchas gracias. One more segment. No. Two runs five minutes, 32 seconds. From Washington, Frank Untether reports and the focus on border culture at the Smithsonian Institution's Annual Festival of American Folklife. The suggested lead in three to one Hollywood movies, news reports and television advertising often give us quick, concise images of people and places along the US Mexico border. Going beyond those media made notions toward real understanding is difficult, even impossible, without first hand contact recently in the nation's capital. There was an attempt to push past media images of the border. It was part of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife. But as Frank Contreras reports from Washington, real cultural understanding required more than a taste of border food or the sounds of border music.
Some young guys from Mexicali were standing in a crowd between the Capitol Building and the Washington Monument, they wore baggy pants, some had dark glasses and others headbands pulled way down low. To some people, they looked like gangsters, but they're not their cello's with a distinctive style of dress that comes straight from the border. Suddenly, they started speaking Spanish out loud. What I said is that the Border Patrol goes through here every day. Let's take our clothes out. I know that from behind a food stand with some beans we're cooking. A guy came out wearing all white with appointed hood clan style. It was the Border Patrol chasing down one of the people watching realized it was a play by a theater group from a Hickley, a border town south of California. The actors were hitting one of the main issues on the border, immigration. Their translator is Quique Aviles.
You know, a lot of people complain that they don't understand because the show is being done in Spanish. But at the same time, you know, that's what life is, you know? Well, Latinos come here. We don't understand either. So, you know, we're talking about that last night and sort of like returning to a woman walked past us dressed like the Virgin of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico. She went past a display where a man was making guitars by hand past a group of murals from El Paso who were painting an eagle and over to a food stand where a black woman who speaks only Spanish was serving tamales and they got a beer. And next to her was a woman from Texas. We're breaking a lot of preconceived ideas, a lot of vices that perhaps have been most influenced by the media. Cynthia Eduardo teaches at the Southwestern Borderlands Cultural Studies and Research Center in Kingsville, Texas. She says the American Folklife Festival in Washington is an opportunity not only for people who've never seen the border, but also for people who've come here from the border to share their cultures. The rest of the world perceives this is what the media makes us out to be, the movies,
the news. And they're really thrilled to have a chance to say, this is who we are. We are living, breathing human beings that have the same eyes as you do. We just take care of those things in a slightly different fashion. That sounds fairly straightforward. And some people walked away from here with more understanding about the people of the borderlands, but not without some effort. At one display, Romy Frias of El Paso was trying to explain to some people from Delaware what a low rider is, you know, a highly stylized car, usually an older model with small, thin tires, maybe a mural painted on the hood and lowered about an inch from the pavement. I tell people that it's really going to mess you up. You're doing about 55 and there's this monster pothole and you've got about an inch clearance, about a lot of friends that face that situation and unfortunately had to learn the hard way. Later, under a shaded area, there was a storytelling session. It was supposed to be about women on the border. An Indian woman from the Mexican side sat on the left. On the right was a white woman who works for the U.S. Border Patrol in the middle of the two women, said a university professor, he was monopolizing the discussion.
Then, at another storytelling session about immigration, the professor was taking over again. Some people in the back were saying it was typical. Here's this white male, the expert not letting the others talk. After the session, I went over to him and learned his name is Enrique Madrid, a man of mixed races whose family migrated to the Americas from France and Spain. Like many others along the border, his family goes back generations. Now, Madrid says he saw many surprised people at the folk fest who learned of the amazing cultural diversity along the border. I mean, just the amazement that you can see in people's faces when they encounter these two black women over here from the from the black Seminole community. They are they are Mexicans. So this is these are really these are really complex cultural entities, complex, like the land where they live. The border is often characterized by clashing cultural forces. Like Madrid says people living on the border crossed the international boundary daily.
But it's no big deal because it's part of their daily life. And he said the people living along the 2000 miles separating line did not come to the border. It came to them. Then he mentioned a series of treaties between the U.S. and Mexico dating back to the late 1800. It's a complex history, a balancing act, he says, because the needs of border people compete with the national needs of Washington and Mexico City. And the result of that struggle is border culture. But culture isn't. It isn't in your blood culture is something that you that you learn culture, culture and identities are things that are negotiated and and forged every day of our lives as we live our lives out in specific areas of the country. La Madrid told me about a sewer line that broke during the festival Sunday morning. Smelly, dark sewer water flooded a small area around some of the exhibits. He and the others said it reminded them of some border towns where pollution has become a major problem. But on the day the sewer broke, people taking part in the American Folklife Festival this
year continued their efforts to share their life's experiences as the smell and humidity surrounded them for Latino USA and Frank Contreras in Washington. Segment number three runs three minutes, 40 seconds. Latino USA is Maria Martin reports on Gruppo Animal, a youth theater group in San Antonio. The group's new production is a series of plays dealing with issues such as teenage pregnancy, gangs and sexual orientation. The suggested lead in three to one hope, it is said. That's one thing young people living in this day and age often lack. But in San Antonio, Texas, a group of teenagers is creating theater that expresses a measure of hope for the future, even amidst a reality of drugs, gangs, identity, questions and homelessness. Along with Lucy Edwards, Maria Martin prepared this report Gruppo Anymore. It's the Friday afternoon at Fox Technical High School in San Antonio.
Young members of the acting troupe, a group of animal ages 13 to 18, have come together to start rehearsing their new production. The group's name derives from the Spanish word, meaning spirit, energy and a desire to inspire. And the drama they're preparing is written and performed by the kids themselves. All the young women and the piece over here, identity, the drama and production is called I Have Hopes, Hopes That Keeps Sacred in My Soul. It's a series of vignettes, tales of young people, much like the members of a group or animal facing life's challenges and learning to cope. It's about a young girl who gets pregnant and she has to tell her parents, because both of us know so many girls who have already gotten pregnant and it's it's not looking better or anything. So I'm 17 years old and I read about the homeless. So much we can learn from our people.
They've gone through rough times. And by that, a lot of them are on the streets and we don't even care about them. I decided to bring up the issue of teenage homosexuality because Hispanic, Mexican-American families, it's hard. It's harder for them to deal with it. There's a lot of tradition and a lot of the tradition is built around the male role model and the female role model. And 14 year old of the US, along with Lupus Cavender and Victoria Rivera are among the nine playwrights who make up a little boy anymore. 16 year old Priscilla Wyatt wrote about a young gang member dealing with the pressures of being tied to his gang, but then wanting to get out and be free and be the life that he wants to lead, that the gang doesn't allow him to pretend you don't understand what what they come after me. They know where I live. They're tearing you apart. They mess around with people's lives like it's nothing. You can't be afraid to be who you are. Don't keep it down forever. I hate them. You know, it's really a lot of what's going on in their minds and in their lives, but
they never have a place to talk about it. Director George Emilio Sanchez of New York is working with a young playwrights and actors of a group anymore. It takes a lot of courage to be a young person, takes a hell of a lot of courage to say, yeah, I'm I'm young, I don't know everything, and I want to be alive. Boom. That to me is like heroic. I think individually, if you read the things they write, no, I don't think they have a lot of hope, but still see the kids. Their stories do express hope as the title of their collective work indicates. Even though we're sad and depressed about it, I think there's always that that bright side and that hope that we have. And that's just what the hope is about. That's why I think that the name of it I have hope so I keep sacred in my soul is what we're using. They're not all happy place with happy endings, but we're not trying to say that the whole world is terrible, you know, that everything's terrible, that there's no hope for anything, even though we know what reality is, you know, we still feel that there can be a change. You know, that there will be a change. And if anybody will be the ones who do that, and
that's our message. Basically a group of animals production of I have hopes, hopes that keeps sacred in My Soul runs through July 17th at San Antonio's Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center. The center's theater director, Europeana, calls the troupe the Next Generation of Chicano Theater US for Latino USA. With Lucy Edwards in San Antonio, our Maria Martin segment number four runs five minutes, 37 seconds. Mandalit del Barco in New York pays tribute to one of salsa's musical superstars. Hector Lavoe aboard died June twenty ninth. The suggested lead in three to one. Hector Lavoe, one of salsa's musical superstars known as the Latin Sinatra, died in New York City on June twenty ninth. After a lifetime of music and tragedy, thousands poured into the streets at his New York funeral. Fans and musicians, they all came to pay tribute to Hector Lavoe from New York. Mandalit del Barco prepared this remembrance.
Series
Latino USA
Episode Number
No. 2
Episode
1993-08-08
Producing Organization
KUT (Radio station : Austin, Tex.)
University of Texas at Austin. Center for Mexican American Studies
Contributing Organization
The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia (Athens, Georgia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip-526-5x25b0036b
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Description
Episode Description
This is Episode Two from Friday, August 8, 1993. Segment A: Puerto Rican political analyst Juan Manuel Garcia Passalaqua about Governor Pedro Rosello's recent signing of a bill calling for a plebiscite to decide the island's future political status. Segment B: The focus on border culture at the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife. #2B: Grupo Animo, a youth theater group in San Antonio. Segment C: Tribute to one of salsa's musical superstars Hector Lavoe. Lavoe died June 29th.
Series Description
"Latino USA presents public radio audiences unique perspectives of U.S. Latinos; provides information to diverse Latino communities of the events affecting their lives; develops a forum for Latino cultural and artistic expression, and strengthens the radio broadcasting capabilities of Latinos. Latino USA accomplishes this by: producing a unique, high-quality, weekly English-language radio journal of news and culture broadcast on public stations nationwide; supporting the training and development of a national network of Latino radio journalists and producers, and other radio professionals; and, promoting cross-cultural understanding among Latino groups, and between Latinos and non-Latinos, through consistent, quality programming and audience outreach."--1993 Peabody Awards entry form.
Description
"Program #1- Aired on Friday, April 30, 1993. "Program Billboard :59[;] News Segment: 5:00 "News segment includes an obituary feature on farm worker labor leader Csar Chvez, who died on April 23, 1993. Segment A: A group of Latino journalists on the status of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and where U.S. Latinos stand on NAFTA. Segment B: Two years after the violent disturbances that took place in the mostly Latino neighborhood of Mount Pleasant. Segment C: Mario Bauza, one of the legendary originators of Latino jazz and a co-founder of the band 'Machito and his Afro Cubans.' #2C: Some thoughts on the joy of rediscovering the really important things in life during a long hike in the mountains of Northern Mexico. Program #2- Aired on Friday, August 8, 1993. Segment A: Puerto Rican political analyst Juan Manuel Garca Passalaqua about Governor Pedro Rosello's recent signing of a bill calling for a plebiscite to decide the island's future political status. Segment B: The focus on border culture at the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife. #2B: Grupo Animo, a youth theater group in San Antonio. Segment C: Tribute to one of salsa's musical superstars Hector Lavoe. Lavoe died June 29th. Program #3- Aired on Friday, November 5, 1993. Segment A: The Latino vote in the New York City and Miami mayoral elections. Segment B: The use of the Mexican holiday and the traditions of 'El Da de Los Muertos' or 'The Day of the Dead' as a springboard for social messages. Segment C: The legendary Latin jazz pianist Eddie Palmieri. #2C: A commentary on why drugs are such a problem among many Latino youth. Program #4- Aired on Friday, December 31, 1993. Segment A: A self-contained panel discussion, with three Latino leaders about the events & trends of 1993. Segment B: Profile on congressman Jos Serrano, the chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. " Latino USA presents public radio audiences unique perspectives of U.S. Latinos; provides information to diverse Latino communities of the events affecting their lives; develops a forum for Latino cultural and artistic expression, and strengthens the radio broadcasting capabilities of Latinos. Latino USA accomplishes this by: producing a unique, high-quality, weekly English-language radio journal of news and culture broadcast on public stations nationwide; supporting the training and development of a national network of Latino radio journalists and producers, and other radio professionals; and, promoting cross-cultural understanding among Latino groups, and between Latinos and non-Latinos, through consistent, quality programming and audience outreach."--1993 Peabody Awards entry form.
Broadcast Date
1993-08-08
Asset type
Episode
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:45:00.912
Embed Code
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Credits
Producing Organization: KUT (Radio station : Austin, Tex.)
Producing Organization: University of Texas at Austin. Center for Mexican American Studies
AAPB Contributor Holdings
The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia
Identifier: cpb-aacip-d4f8d59546e (Filename)
Format: 1/4 inch audio cassette
Duration: 0:29:00
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Citations
Chicago: “Latino USA; No. 2; 1993-08-08,” 1993-08-08, The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 26, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-5x25b0036b.
MLA: “Latino USA; No. 2; 1993-08-08.” 1993-08-08. The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 26, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-5x25b0036b>.
APA: Latino USA; No. 2; 1993-08-08. Boston, MA: The Walter J. Brown Media Archives & Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-526-5x25b0036b