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Welcome to bluegrass and bounty program of all time American music. In the days before Radio America was pretty much a do it yourself affair with music providing a great deal of entertainment. Music was a source of enjoyment in and of itself topical songs kept people informed of what was going on in different parts of the country and learning to play musical instruments helped pass the time in the Southern Appalachian Mountains the most popular musical form several generations ago was the string band typically consisting of guitar banjo autoharp mandolin and similar instruments. The music performed by these bands at gatherings and local functions had a very definite style and flavor referred to today as old time or old timey music. The modern resurgence of interest in folk music has once again called attention to this musical genre.
Bluegrass and mountains as a series of programs on which we'll hear a wide range of songs that were popular in old America. On this introductory program let's listen first to a song depicting preparations for a weekend picnic called Hot Corn cold corn the cold corn referred to in the song comes in a demi john and it's corn liquor. The lead instrument in the song is the mandolin and it's played by the New Lost City Ramblers the New Lost City Ramblers as a group which delights in sounding old timey and specializes in songs from the 1980s and the depression as well as earlier times in American history. Louis. With. Their downstairs out and the kitchen up stairs down there is out and the kitchen they are downstairs out and they get to that. Old Coco just the real an individual.
On going cold on bringing along the damage on the current goes on bringing along a bandage on. I'm going to go call and bring along a mammoth job. Thank you ma'am. Heard a guy make an unknown to us. With. The land Sally. Some of the gang. Know Landsat. Again the Orlando Bloom. Feeling the. Light hand brings in a large. Way. To. Stay. On. The. Phone call bringing along a damage on the front go bring longer damage on guard coming along with them because they demand a bird a gallon each and I'm already missing. Teeth. All i
keep me happy is. The ball the ball and the having the name Orlando long name the day he was. Planning to. Agree to say. I'm. Going to Come bring along the damage on my car and go kart racing along the Danube John I'm going to go down and bring the longer they moved on. The land the first guy on the chain and all right. Great seeing the boat they're taking in the money children and because they give me money for Lansana just jumping with joy with a lot of people at a console. I'm going cold going along with the image on high calling cold calling bringing along the damage on my phone goes on bring along a band with John Maeda bannock heard a guy named Jane I'm sorry.
Three dollars come on and the children are crying for you to call the company and the children are. Free to. Come when the children are young. Chickenhead the ringing of the toenail declined. Going cold calling bringing along the name of John Doe song bring along the band The John. Cole going along with a Madonna. When I heard it galloping in the morning. Yeah. A lot of old time music traces its origins to the British Isles the pioneering settlers in the southern hills were a fairly homogeneous stock and took with them to the new world ancient instruments and songs. Once in America however their music continued to evolve and become more and more distinct from its European origins and some styles of playing the banjo for instance. The fifth string is played as a drone much as the drone and bagpipe music Bill
Monroe provides us with an excellent example of this process in the song called Scotland. Two fiddles tune slightly apart from each other provide in effect strongly resembling the wailing of bagpipes just to prove that the songs in the American idiom However there's a brief mandolin break in the middle with some very bluesy sounding progressions. Would thank you would.
Go over. Thank you. Thank you. So much. Would I ever would. Thanks would much much would.
A true aficionados of old timey music are constantly troubled by the distinction between ethnic and commercial folk artists. The distinction is a meaningless one sometimes in terms of the musical ability of the performers on bluegrass and mountains will hear music of both types and leave it to the listener to resolve this thorny issue of artistic integrity. This is a big John Hurt's about as ethnic as you can get. He was born in Carroll County Mississippi in March 1892 and except for a brief recording session for OK Records in 1928 had until recently never considered himself a professional musician. Nonetheless his music is certainly of the highest quality. We're going to hear him play a variant of Casey Jones a song about a famous train wreck which many of our listeners are familiar with. IT companies himself on the 12 string guitar. Yes.
Well. All I want. In my. Boy. Band. There with. The. Way. I'm. Playing. In. The world. Why. Do you go. To
bed. With a. Good. Bread. Maker. If you. Buy they. Put it all. Out in.
The same. Be. Told. To the right. Through. The. Phone. Thorough. Sweating. With. Him saying. 6:30. That was Mississippi John Hurt playing Casey Jones on future programs of bluegrass and mountains will hear more songs about train wrecks about old fashioned romances songs of historical interest and many others. Next week we start a group of programs about individual instruments and old time string bands will hear programs about the autoharp
about the guitar mandolin and other instruments. And next week's program is going to be devoted to the mandolin and.
Series
Bluegrass and mountains
Episode
Introduction to old time music
Producing Organization
University of Michigan
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-t727fq58
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-t727fq58).
Description
Episode Description
This program gives an introduction to the types of music that are explored in the series.
Series Description
Recordings of and talk about a wide variety of old time American music.
Broadcast Date
1966-07-13
Topics
Music
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:14:31
Embed Code
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Credits
Host: Fidell, S. A. (Sanford A.)
Producing Organization: University of Michigan
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 66-36-1 (National Association of Educational Broadcasters)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 00:14:20
If you have a copy of this asset and would like us to add it to our catalog, please contact us.
Citations
Chicago: “Bluegrass and mountains; Introduction to old time music,” 1966-07-13, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed October 5, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-t727fq58.
MLA: “Bluegrass and mountains; Introduction to old time music.” 1966-07-13. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. October 5, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-t727fq58>.
APA: Bluegrass and mountains; Introduction to old time music. Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-t727fq58