thumbnail of Intertel; 29; Children of the Revolution
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Series
Intertel
Episode Number
29
Episode
Children of the Revolution
Producing Organization
Rediffusion Television Ltd. (London, England)
Contributing Organization
Thirteen WNET (New York, New York)
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/75-84zgn1tz
NOLA Code
ITTL
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Description
Episode Description
What is it like to be a young person living under a communist regime? And what is the attitude of a typical communist government towards its young people? Intertel: Children of the Revolution sets out to answer these questions by examining the lives of youths behind the Iron Curtain in Czechoslovakia. Concentrating on life in Prague, the program sharply points up the fact that the committed, militant communism among Czech youths of 17 years ago has faded. The young people of today are strikingly similar to those in western countries. Largely apolitical, their chief leisure interest is "best ' music and dancing. They prefer idealism to ideology and private to public experience, and are severely critical of their elders. Children of the Revolution also looks at the state's highly efficient welfare and health care program for the young. The state operates a legalized abortion system and assists couples in planning their families, but it is having second thoughts about its institutionalized nurseries that enable mothers to be free to work. The psychological effects of leaving children in the care of attendants have prompted authorities to encourage parents to limit their children's stay in the nursery to no longer than six hours a day. As it roams Prague to show the everyday lives of Czech youths, Children of the Revolution depicts the young people's concern for individualism and a sense of direction, their resentment of being regimented and taught repeated hackneyed phrases of Marxism and Leninism, and their desire to left alone. Their attitudes are observed and expressed in dance halls where they congregate to dance and listen to the "big beat" sounds of rock n ' roll music; in cases where entertainers publicly mock communist Party leaders and ideologies; in small discussion, literary, and leisure-seeking groups. The program also presents the candid views of several unhesitant Czech youths. Among them are the following: "I don 't like the way they lump all young people together as bad. The moment you get a little bit extra modern in your dress or dance a bit wilder they say you 're a hooligan." "I don 't like the way politics are mixed up with everything. I don 't like it." "Adults tell us all the time you 're young and one day you 'll inherit our standard of living. But we know what this standard of living is like. We know what a state the state is in." "Why don 't they tell us the whole situation is very bad but it will be better one day? When we 're 17 or 18 we look around us and see what things are really like." Intertel: Children of the Revolution: a production of Rediffusion Television Ltd. of London for the International Television Federation. This hour-long piece was recorded on film. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Other Description
Intertel, a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television, was conceived in November 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produced on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel "more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding," he added. "I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming." Donald H. McGannon, President of WBC, hailed the new organization as "a pool of the technical and creative ability and knowledge of all the groups which will extend the international horizons of television in all aspects. This is the first practical step, after years of talking and hoping, toward the creation and use of international television for cultural exchange and an effective weapon for peace." By having observers examine topics far removed from their everyday assignments, Intertel gives viewers a fresh viewpoint. The founder members indicated that by dubbing these programs in foreign languages and making them available to all nations, they hoped television companies in Europe, Asia and South America will eventually join this unique project. The supervisory committee for the United States programming segments consists of Mr. McGannon and Mr. White; Richard M. Pack, WBC Vice President - Programming; and Robert Hudson, NET Vice President for Programming. Intertel came into formal being November 14, 1960, in a special meeting in Vancouver, B.C., and the culmination of plans for such an association which has been under way for a long time. John McMilliam of Associate Rediffusion, was named contemporary Coordinating Officer at that time. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Description
Intertel is a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television. Intertel was conceived in November, 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produces on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding, he added. I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming.
Broadcast Date
1965-07-21
Asset type
Episode
Genres
Documentary
Topics
Social Issues
Public Affairs
Media type
Moving Image
Credits
Director: Beattie, Randal
Executive Producer: Windlesham, David James George Hennessy, Baron, 1932-2010
Narrator: Kee, Robert
Producing Organization: Rediffusion Television Ltd. (London, England)
Writer: Kee, Robert
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Thirteen - New York Public Media (WNET)
Identifier: wnet_aacip_2299 (WNET Archive)
Format: 16mm film
Duration: 00:55:03?
Library of Congress
Identifier: 2418884-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: B&W
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Identifier: [request film based on title] (Indiana University)
Format: 16mm film
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Citations
Chicago: “Intertel; 29; Children of the Revolution,” 1965-07-21, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed May 25, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-84zgn1tz.
MLA: “Intertel; 29; Children of the Revolution.” 1965-07-21. Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. May 25, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-84zgn1tz>.
APA: Intertel; 29; Children of the Revolution. Boston, MA: Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-84zgn1tz