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Series
Intertel
Episode Number
2
Episode
The Heartbeat of France
Producing Organization
Associated-Rediffusion
Contributing Organization
Thirteen WNET (New York, New York)
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/75-59q2c25s
NOLA Code
ITTL
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Description
Episode Description
For its second episode, Intertel turns to France, a familiar and puzzling ally and partner in our Western heritage. France has just come through another period of turmoil; but despite the apparent instability of her political structure, there is something permanent and enduring about the nation as a whole. What explains the frequent dislocations of the French government? And how can one talk of the permanence of a nation so politically volatile? The key to understanding France lies in the individuals that make up the French people. The Heartbeat of France turns to the intimate lives of three families. Andre Fortin is a farmer in the Loire Valley, Robert Badoux, a jeweler in a little-visited quarter of Paris; Gilbert Roger, an industrial worker in one of France's most modern automobile factories. By examining their daily activities, and the attitudes these reflect the viewer comes closer perhaps than he has ever been to understanding the combination of fierce individualism and acceptance of tradition that produces the paradoxes of France. After an introduction that unites outstanding film clips of the first and second World Wars, the inter-war turbulence, and the frequent political explosions of the post-war period, the program turns to Andre Fortin, the farmer. His way of life has not changed much since the Renaissance, when the town of Blois where he sells his produce was built. The camera then shifts to Robert Badoux, independent jeweler artisan of the Marais, one of the oldest sections of Paris. Badoux, like Fortin, is proud of his independence; like Fortin, he rarely travels out of the small section of the capital in which he lives and works. It is doubtful that he knows or cares much about the destination of the jewelry he creates the dazzling, fabulous world of fashion typified by the House of Dior. But the camera unites there two Paris ', and takes the viewer into the workroom where Marc Bohan, the new "Mr. Dior," creates a gown out of a piece of cloth of two buttons, and into the bustle and cacophony of the dressing room where models change clothes, hats, and jewelry in the frantic haste of a formal showing. Again the camera shifts, this time to the second largest city in France. Marseilles, where it tours the squalor of the old quarter and the shining modernity of the new apartment buildings and factories. Then it moves back to the outskirts of Paris to explore the lives of a third family, that of Gilbert Roger. Roger, his wife, and two children live in a modern apartment; they have the use of new schools, shops, a public library, a gymnasium, all located in the community that has grown up around the Renault auto works. This is the New France that has emerged in an age of increased industrialization. For people like Gilbert Roger, there is no longer any need to register as a communist; the new prosperity has made him more contented, less restless. The same, however, cannot be said for the people of another community in the Paris area the shanty-town that houses Algerians who have come to France hoping to improve their condition. This shanty-town epitomizes the Algerian problem, which has been draining lives and money at an alarming rate. It was partly as a result of the Algerian conflict that General De Gaulle was returned to power; and it is to him that most French people look for a resolution of their political problems. But the young people, in particular as the camera shows are more interested in jazz and the "nouvelle vague" films than they are in politics. The art they admire is unorthodox and rebellious witness the painting of Yves Klein and yet it, like the increasing number of young people, symbolizes the rebirth of a strong, youthful nation, devoted to individualism but secure in its affection for tradition. The Heartbeat of France was produced for Intertel by Associated Rediffusion, Ltd., of London. The theme song, "Les P 'tits Francais" was written by Marguerite Monnot, who composed the music for "Irma la Douce." It is sung by Colete Renard. This hour-long piece was recorded on film. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Series Description
Intertel, a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television, was conceived in November 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produced on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel "more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding," he added. "I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming." Donald H. McGannon, President of WBC, hailed the new organization as "a pool of the technical and creative ability and knowledge of all the groups which will extend the international horizons of television in all aspects. This is the first practical step, after years of talking and hoping, toward the creation and use of international television for cultural exchange and an effective weapon for peace." By having observers examine topics far removed from their everyday assignments, Intertel gives viewers a fresh viewpoint. The founder members indicated that by dubbing these programs in foreign languages and making them available to all nations, they hoped television companies in Europe, Asia and South America will eventually join this unique project. The supervisory committee for the United States programming segments consists of Mr. McGannon and Mr. White; Richard M. Pack, WBC Vice President - Programming; and Robert Hudson, NET Vice President for Programming. Intertel came into formal being November 14, 1960, in a special meeting in Vancouver, B.C., and the culmination of plans for such an association which has been under way for a long time. John McMilliam of Associate Rediffusion, was named contemporary Coordinating Officer at that time. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Description
Intertel is a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television. Intertel was conceived in November, 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produces on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding, he added. I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming.
Broadcast Date
1961-07-16
Asset type
Program
Genres
Documentary
Topics
Global Affairs
Public Affairs
Media type
Moving Image
Credits
Camera Operator: Curtis, Jack
Director: Morley, Peter
Editor: Batchelder, Mike
Guest: Fortin, Andre
Guest: Bohan, Marc
Guest: Badoux, Robert
Guest: Roger, Gilbert
Narrator: Finch, Peter
Producing Organization: Associated-Rediffusion
Writer: Bennett, Cyril
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Thirteen - New York Public Media (WNET)
Identifier: wnet_aacip_2289 (WNET Archive)
Format: 16mm film
Duration: 00:50:35?
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1856739-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: B&W
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Citations
Chicago: “Intertel; 2; The Heartbeat of France,” 1961-07-16, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 21, 2024, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-59q2c25s.
MLA: “Intertel; 2; The Heartbeat of France.” 1961-07-16. Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 21, 2024. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-59q2c25s>.
APA: Intertel; 2; The Heartbeat of France. Boston, MA: Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-59q2c25s