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mixed at work nineteen sixties became we can
feed food things by the pope it is a national educational television network presents at issue a monthly commentary on people events and ideas
on august six nineteen forty five this building was hiroshima as new industrial exhibition hall today is preserved and the atomic bomb twenty years of past hiroshima is totally rebuilt their no upward skies but the memory of that day is still there that in the minds of those who survived bringing them out at the time of the explosion was a hiroshima newspaper reporter day years ago for many of the two hundred thousand tourists visit the city annually father william klein's on a german jesuit priest has lived in hiroshima i have for thirty years today he still suffers from radiation sickness this recently completed catholic church places the nation building or father cline song was when the bomb exploded
reverend yoshi tenement tourism methodist minister on the outskirts of town when the bomb destroyed his church he was one of the first re entered the city and company injured today in this rebuilt church he continues his work with survivors this time sushi has been teaching english in hiroshima for thirty years before the war she studied in the united states on august six nineteen forty five and her students were in the streets helping to prepare the city's defenses against an american invasion when she was at her home one mile from the center for most of her students were killed nation barely survived this is where she wouldn't have asked catholics
in baghdad it does that's right ten seconds well the only thing
it is senate member nothing standing in the garden outside of circles standing in front of the house and served version of the right to know their family or the range and anger so i think about those clips in their wounded contracts the new screeners of bowden move on the ballot he heard that i found the house behind me and stuff in doing so that's assuming people and women can wonder are higher than
ideal yang when they were hatched it was but it meant that the family in the same place that it was mixed with meaning he's gotten about the circlet rise from his case and then the nsa and place was based on my heart i'm thinking
he's god that's it is it i'm not a license or an nsf i have learned in my life because if i saw it as a fireman who just hate because vegas is often resent it because it makes it into the music i dash into history escapades trying to save their outcome can make
now off know share scheme from faces nerve i'm hung any expression of the english and hindi songs that ice skating association that i mean and i was looking for
sales clerk i have last season's finale and sandy expected to take things out of thousands of pursuant to save some people's rare and deadly and you save five things a fly out well so the new york city police and our lives in a south alabama town
and us those memos it is it is for years and that evening
and i'm the bank and that there are many seriously injured people and women and that there were ipods and so on prize after the group made a time to come up with a motivation expression i'm just i was so you promote now iranians arrested i couldn't move infer that i landed on iran closely next morning i found many people that i have a kind of pain that they do another
peace prize they had on them was you the gnome ish for me on aug nine a second atomic bomb fell on nagasaki shortly thereafter the emperor speaking on radio for the first time i announced japan's surrender in hiroshima reverend canon law don't want to what was left of the railroad station where a small group of survivors many severely injured gathered to hear the broadcast and cash that were in that day and so in ways that we've finished this is law so all right
the atomic bomb that fell on hiroshima was the equivalent of twenty thousand tons of tnt accrued and insignificant device by today's standards but the statistics and destruction were awesome ninety seven percent of all structures in a mile and operate is destroyed totally estimated at over seventy thousand in the weeks following many more died of radiation sickness been removed nearby villages by the end of the year a third of the population remained in the city today twenty years later the population has risen to have a minion twenty percent higher than before the war little by little people came back and the population swells japanese return from the lions' they had conquered a nation many of these people came to hiroshima a city that needed new people why did they and the original citizens come back to your assistant to the mayor of hiroshima
it's in those prisons hiroshima lies beneath a semi circle of mountains on the engine the intensity on one of the hills stands ancient yoshino cancel the palace of a few large in the city below almost nothing is more than twenty years of the people of hiroshima began the rebuilding of their city with a little help from anyone gradually industry return during our hiroshima was a military city
warships the dogs rather than tanks roll off assembly lines hiroshima is proud of its wide streets new steel and concrete buildings are replacing wooden houses of twenty years ago cousin shemona because the old city i mean or that having the many baskets that the barriers we've seen this case that the bombing
made a visa that getting this passed that i'll be heading as you seem to say i've learned nothing can be able to say yes because that may be a journey and we were surprised that makes the us worrying that the bombing to sandman says that victim back in place to somewhere that they have to do that less than that these men and many hundreds of the new hires as it seems to be uncertain you know humans have any weapons and the japanese community the city continues to expand closer to the mountains which encircled but underneath hiroshima is unique the senators
opposed a tiny population in the long term effects of radiation set up in nineteen forty seven the abc series is a giant undertaking of the us national academy of sciences and the japanese ministry of health records of over one hundred thousand survivors are kept here missions twenty thousand adults and children and the results are compared with a matching group of people not exposed among the findings are constantly brought up today for instance the incidence of leukemia in people exposed within one thousand yards of the highbrow center reached a peak in nineteen fifty three when there was a thirty to fifty fold increase what are some of the findings today dr antonio trouble abcs he's head of statistical
studies younger individuals that didn't lose a younger at the time and nobody that and those were not in new orleans ah second and kenya has occurred among those exposed to the bomb into postage windows and the others into the others but the frequency has been such that the rate perhaps a new city is about fifteen times that of these that among those who oppose is about fifteen times that of the others but you know i think it should be kept and navigating with rare events for example the age but up to nineteen
sixty two we head about two twenty three guests from leukemia among the youngsters that is among the youngsters zero nineteen years of age at the time about and we would have expected about to perhaps if they had followed days than normal incidence lot of the incidences are usually done in a population like we think we're beginning to see some evidence of cancer they occur with a group from concern among survivors tend to fire in particular seems to be something that is coming up now with greater frequency then you saw before remember we're talking about the years lived between nineteen fifty and that was a nineteen sixty
four well in this than perhaps the life of those who are closer to the bottom have been shown by about one year in contrast to those who have the possibility of genetic abnormalities has caused the greatest concern now over seventy thousand bridges and nagasaki and hiroshima had been examined the only genetic change of critical consequence results of a greater tendency for a couple to have little children if the father was heavily exposed and female children if the mother was exposed studies show no increase in abnormalities are still nervous the abcs he now believes that the possibility of adverse effects in future generations is remote the publication of these findings is relieve some towns in the mountains of survivors but there are still many unknown factors studies known promise of the abc see what shed more light on the problems of this and future generations
meanwhile the fact that there are people today who suffered the after effects of radiation creates anxiety among survivors and prejudice against them when they wish to marry a fine jobs at hiroshima as red cross hospital especially english members receive free medical treatment since its opening in nineteen fifty six and in one hundred fifty thousand of patients last do three hundred five patients were hospitalized fifty two and that is going to directly attributed to atomic explosion but statistics do indicate a relationship the performing should get the director of the hospital is a survivor examines many of the patients and personally supervised the treatment of the severely ill this help me to cry mr mcgee mean at fifty six years of the same lyrics of that one point five
percent that cigar la crosse so so these concerts about six years ago his fists in the air personally yes this into the sea some from chronic ran outside to see get into the crossfire six mites nineteen sixty five and activating other lives of my era again harley a subtle will expel was going to have you with
us from memphis and steel rollers to them cds and go see indictment of spitting and i think that he's you know whereas status the war that more than forty were unaffected in kenya unfortunate to see initially the next idea again just to get those initial game and seek him so parents this year see how crummy clusters of funded paper cranes hang above this has sometimes been believe this monument in hiroshima is peace park thousands of similar paper cranes according to legend anyone who follows one thousand paper cranes will live a long life several years ago they became a special simple a young girl who had been exposed to the bombs an
infant was suddenly stricken with leukemia in a hospital and she began folding paper cranes can only complete nine nineteen sixty four before she died her classmates finished the rest and this monument was billed as a memorial to children of the a bomb the peace park is located in the area which was just beneath the center of the blast each year on the sixth of august thousands of people gathered here for memorial ceremonies at other times of the year tourists and local citizens on leisurely stroll to take pictures and enjoy the outdoors the peace museum stands at the entrance to the park over two hundred thousand japanese and foreign visitors go through it every year a series of incidents nineteen forties but
some victims humans a circular clay model of the devastated city visitors including many americans hiroshima is an overnight stop in most packaged tours of japan americans who visit the museum to meetings and their feelings about them mm hmm
it is it's been it's been
because because because because because it i really appreciate this because and the explanation initially considered the japanese version which the schoolchildren here says simply that it was used as an act of war there is little public effort in the
schools are not government to educate children in the moral and political issues raised by the ban however these issues often exploited by the press and television for many americans the questions raised by the bombing are still great interest in the effort to find answers has become a life's work barbara reynolds has been living in hiroshima for five years long active in the world peace movement he sails are built the phoenix on a protest voyage into the bikini testing it he's also traveled to moscow on a peace mission recently established a new friendship center in hiroshima i'm working with a group of people here tufano a friendship center what we are hoping that indicate as well transit center in august interview we hope and no way of working for peace too cooperation to understand they are trying to have a
place with all of the people who come from different countries with different ideas can get together and these pieces and gradually make her chin on their internationally minded center and also concerned place where people try to help each other one of the things that is so unfortunate is that many people come here propaganda and said to make perhaps they promise a third says mia chinese economists of course while he was at the point out who is the enemy of peace that people from malaysia and if they show so i do worry about
yes it is and the person and a close allies throughout not wanting to merely and senate and they say well what about pearl harbor and they don't wish to consider wow that was the beginning of it that pearl harbor was an act of violence and that this act of violence broke into no violence and that eventually led to hiroshima contact is a social worker who lives in hiroshima we asked him how he felt when he first came to the city some are most responsible for this and so
it is i cause those suits are thinking maybe but i think as you get into the city and to know what the city is thinking i think to broaden out so something more basic nation of course the thing about this city that has impressed me is and families have a mutual repentance and that mutual forgiveness so i'm gone from emphasizing thinking about the deal to what happened twenty years ago yes it is
thank you it's mine tag also counsels young people and industry problems most frequently discuss these group sessions rapid industrialization automation and the impersonality of the business world powers women hiroshima as the arts world japan however are continuing growing demand keeps assembly lines in motion notion most value for your factory one of the largest in japan and eighteen thousand workers they turned out one thousand popular price matters because every day in an expanding economy patterned frankly after the american system and strongly influenced by the american dream the demand shows no sign of innovation there's no one car for every twenty five people in the ocean and will implement at one hundred twenty percent more people can afford one every day there's plenty to buy ammunition at a brightly lit shopping arcade is always crowded with bargain hunters western clones
are slowly replacing sandals and condoms mr reid yeah singing the fast developing countries in hiroshima many of the poor are survivors within sight of the atomic bomb one of the city's largest slums birds along the bank of the old over half its inhabitants are survivors in nineteen forty five this man in a comfortable home in the center of hiroshima and a successful upholstery shop nearby then the bomb destroyed both his house and business weekend by radiation disease he rented a house in the suburbs that money soon ran out he and his wife came here now after twenty years of living and doing occasional work in the same small room they have lost hope of rebuilding our home and
business this is a neighborhood of large families including those too young too low they are too old to learn some families live on government welfare payments of about thirty dollars a month a laborer in road construction firms little more during august la was an army camp today nearly six thousand wooden shacks built ran against the next stretch in from the river along narrow passageways after the bomb when the city was covered with debris the playground offered an open space thousands of homeless survivors came here using the wreckage of the army barracks they build temporary shelters these dwellings still stand a chart what remains and for the survivors there's little hope of leaving the survivors who live here are those who still suffer the lingering effects of the mom
this woman's husband died from radiation sickness two weeks after the bomb she herself has been in constant pain from a spiral fractured her daughter are divorced with five children must work as a waitress thirteen hours a day to support the family this housewife is also a survivor since the bombs she has suffered from general weakness and fatigue a frequent complaint of those exposed to radiation the scams totaled spend on the hospital ship industry survivors who came in and again have been joined by the traditional poor koreans who came to japan as cheap labor and japanese of the lowest caste these people perform the most menial jobs their children will not be accepted by a university unlike the children of survivors they will find it difficult to marry outside their own group
this land belongs to the city of hiroshima and city planning that initially was part of the peace corps but no one knows when the sharks will come down or wherever people will go survivors make up one fifth of hiroshima us population except for the poor and physically ill though not noticeably different from the majority of citizens a lot of the same kinds of jobs and lead similar laws he was in the street other survivors have sought anonymity on the outskirts of hiroshima is the home and beauty shop of jesus's way of humor she was one of the hiroshima maidens
young women so disfigured by facial scar is that a normal life seemed impossible through the efforts of reverend <unk> and cousins and others she went to the united states for plastic surgery and professional training and in return she opened her own beauty salon and one soon afterward she was married once a year she takes me to the piece and an emotional system a simple tribute to those who suffered from the bombings on the plane and pigs in recent years hiroshima baseball stadium has been filled with peace delegations from around the world but the meetings have become less and less concern he's a japanese peace movement was no split among three battling political factions social
democratic coalition and pro chinese the latter denounced the united states not having nuclear arms but make no reference to the red chinese weapon college students have formed their own along political lines last year's meetings were marred by disagreement this year at a time when japan's leaders are seriously debating the question of partial reality special importance united states ambassador to japan and when rush hour explains to andrew stern how the atomic experience has affected japanese thinking it's basically just many reasons strong tendency towards pacifism and i think that common experience of these and that in a very special
sensitivity to anything a company you feel that because the chinese have had a nuclear device that we're almost a year that japanese thinking about this problem is going to change it and in may a certain number of japanese are beginning to think realistically about the specific problem of defense and so the thing is with that passages in prison and these faces most japanese by any means why is this and so that impression is there is another great shot of the aftermath american occupation and the sensitive to the reality that he's turned into a very very much and that over the last twenty years or just attended to the american role in stabilizing
security reasons what about some of the demonstrations against military bases against atomic submarines just a latino thinking about these maintains peace in japan japanese can accept american defense to a certain extent and the same time protest against presence of troops recently seem contradictory that last minute changes epics understand that contradiction understand what existed i mean is this something fairly typical in terms of us were japanese thinking because there's nothing like that in pretty well explain what members of the passengers plus is
she your song editor and the japan times goes on the atomic experience relates to japanese pacifism no it has infested didn't get measles thinking so deeply so they're so family did these old foe the peace at any price as you say that and that is the possibility the late nineties but it was based on a bus signal that cuba their thinking after day so it's not so much about hiroshima and nagasaki the surplus and that those two hundred meter
dash of it is you fear that one day japan to be part of the nuclear club i'm fifty six years ago now a long as i am up to say yes oh the august you have to seed it then the beheading and then if they decide to have it again delayed as long as the government is concerned we had a bubble but we do as a country well the oil producing and going through the building against having recent public opinion polls show that the majority of japanese people are against nuclear weapons and nuclear testing in hiroshima on these settlements are particularly strong and then we have and i'm astounded and yet americans going to hiroshima rarely encountered any open desert and
then three hiroshima citizens explain this lack of bitterness on americans i know that right after the disastrous and in japan ahead she might have moved them a question give not tomorrow mm hmm
these years this is in the sixties one of japan's leading literary critics find the question of bitterness of perplexing one thing that is in their allies in this kind of touchy and has served mostly getting the
news we're told from the chinese are very tense in there to hate other people that they're frightened and on top of that the disaster in tuition there is no sniper natural disaster and disaster caused by human and that really is a reason why they didn't express any conscious bitterness against humanity best theme penetrate into the into the deed he didn't have some consciousness in my personal opinion that there is it means peace movement is now it's connected ways some kind of sudden conscious because that is in athens and of course he says some consciousness intent
it is it is most addicted to the experience we have in hiroshima in nineteen forty five that the kind of course the people of the solution the city a hit and natalie zea as usual people that say he kept that in japan that site as a fan that possibly stage a hit by the same experiences and this is something where they have to communicate things as food haven't suffered from this particular tragedy and that was a day that i tried to talk about in public let's look at that there's a piece about the city
and they'd say deb is people in syria and speaking of that the hair that's here with just consumed tons of those that means that day there's a it's the deepest fears of survivors have to do with our children the incidence of leukemia and has no genetic findings are reassuring but statistics cannot allay the anxieties of each pen for his own trial lemons because i have had friends for instance things i had a friend whose daughter was just a divider who just about that issue going to have high school became sick with
leukemia and six months instead radiation obviously affect your thinking the nation thank you and if a young girl from clay johnson was known some years ago as a child to give birth to a child and he says well there's great anxiety in the months before the child
the monster i'm renee montagne the incidents in the city there's no way of knowing how long the psychological impact of the bomber lives of the most visible remnant may soon disappear the atomic bomb located in the center of the city close to the river occupies a choice piece of real estate doesn't talk of tearing it down and replacing it with a new building to house the chamber of commerce filed a client's on comments i don't know but certainly a lot of people who said don't listen to him and say no it has to stand
so i personally pro i hadn't talk right in the fun of this person that i sing it isn't a person it's the long knives live in who sees this ends at the effects of those is the agency's st lucy's family never have only an impression of snow of six months i think
it's because it is what happens to the atomic bomb will not change the meaning of hiroshima its place in history was assured on august six nineteen forty five that experience gave rise to build atomic weapons would never be used again in japan the slogan no more hiroshima is became a familiar phrase today some of the survivors wonder whether the lesson of hiroshima woman learn and implemented well yes
today dramatic documentary feature the beginning so that people only touched by human contact with those who know what it means fb twenty years ago on the destruction of hiroshima revealed to learn the power within the atom today the new hiroshima reveals the strength of human nature in these first two decades of the nuclear age the atomic formula has lost its mystery five nations now have built the bombs others wish to have
it in nineteen sixty five he only atomic secrets is how to stop finding a way to be the greatest fb fb
Series
At Issue
Episode Number
58
Episode
Hiroshima
Producing Organization
National Educational Television and Radio Center
Contributing Organization
Thirteen WNET (New York, New York)
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/75-171vhrvn
Public Broadcasting Service Series NOLA
HROS 000000
NOLA Code
AISS
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/75-171vhrvn).
Description
"There was a yellow flash. I didn't know what happened. There was no sound at all. But the next moment I found myself buried in darkness. I sat in the darkness thinking a bomb hit my house and I was there to die?" The atomic bomb that fell on Hiroshima was the equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT. By today's standards it was a crude nuclear weapon, but the statistics of destruction were awesome - 78,000 people killed and ninety-seven percent of all structures within a two mile radius totally destroyed. Today, twenty years later, the city is completely rebuilt, but the memory of August 6, 1945, remains vivid in the minds of those who survived. In a special documentary program commemorating the twentieth anniversary of that grim day, National Educational Television's "At Issue" revisits the Japanese City for a first-hand report on the people and the city which were the world's first victims of nuclear destruction. The one-hour program which presents a detailed picture of conditions in modern day Hiroshima will be broadcast. As N.E.T. cameras record the sights and sounds of the bustling Japanese metropolis, producer-correspondent Andrew Stern talks with a cross-section of Japanese and Americans who discuss the events of that fateful day in 1945 in terms of what they mean to Hiroshima and Japan today. Edwin Reischauer, U.S. Ambassador to Japan, comments on how the atomic experience has affected Japanese thinking regarding the war. Survivors recall the horror and tragedy of the nuclear holocaust, and scientists, government officials, journalists, and Americans in Hiroshima discuss the bomb's political and psychological implications, the physical effects still evident among its victims, the medical and scientific research being continued to aid them, national attitudes toward the United States, and Japan's growing trend toward pacifism. Featured Personalities: Edwin Reischauer, U.S. Ambassador to Japan; Antonio Ciocco, head of statistical studies, Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission; Dr. Fumio Shigeto, director of Hiroshima's Red Cross Hospital; Barbara Reynolds, founder of Hiroshima's Friendship Center, and a longtime activist in the World Peace Movements; Kasushige Hirasawa, editor of Japan Times; Marvin Tack, an American social worker in Hiroshima.
There was a yellow flash. I didn 't know what happened. There was no sound at all. But the next moment I found myself buried in darkness. I sat in the darkness thinking a bomb hit my house and I was there to die. The atomic bomb that fell on Hiroshima was the equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT. By today's standards it was a crude nuclear weapon, but the statistics of destruction were awesome 78,000 people killed and ninety-seven percent of all structures within a two mile radius totally destroyed. Today, twenty years later, the city is completely rebuilt, but the memory of August 6, 1945, remains vivid in the minds of those who survived. In a special documentary program commemorating the twentieth anniversary of that grim day, National Educational Television's "At Issue" revisits the Japanese City for a first-hand report on the people and the city which were the world's first victims of nuclear destruction. The one-hour program which presents a detailed picture of conditions in modern day Hiroshima will be broadcast. As N.E.T. cameras record the sights and sounds of the bustling Japanese metropolis, producer-correspondent Andrew Stern talks with a cross-section of Japanese and Americans who discuss the events of that fateful day in 1945 in terms of what they mean to Hiroshima and Japan today. Edwin Reischauer, U.S. Ambassador to Japan, comments on how the atomic experience has affected Japanese thinking regarding the war. Survivors recall the horror and tragedy of the nuclear holocaust, and scientists, government officials, journalists, and Americans in Hiroshima discuss the bomb's political and psychological implications, the physical effects still evident among its victims, the medical and scientific research being continued to aid them, national attitudes toward the United States, and Japan's growing trend toward pacifism. N.E.T.'s Alvin Perlmutter is the executive producer of "At Issue: Hiroshima." Lois Cunniff is the associate producer. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
The special report, filmed by N.E.T. entirely in Japan, examines the people and the city which were the victims of the world's first nuclear explosion on the twentieth anniversary of the event (August 6, 1945). Through a documentary film, narration, and a series of interviews with survivors, scientists, government officials, Americans in Hiroshima, and journalists, the on location documentary recalls the horror and tragedy of the nuclear explosion and also assesses the bomb's political and psychological implications, the physical effects still being felt by its victims, the medical and scientific research being continued to aid them, national attitudes toward the United States and the A-bomb's influence on the growing Japanese trend toward pacifism. People featured include Edwin Reischauer, U.S. Ambassador to Japan; Tazu Shibama, an English teacher in Hiroshima for thirty years, who miraculously survived the A-blast; Rihei Numata, a Hiroshima newspaper reporter at the time of the explosion, now a tourist guide; Father William Tanimoto, a German Jesuit priest who has lived in Hiroshima for thirty years, and who still suffers from radiation sickness; Rev. Kiyoshi Tanimoto, a Methodist minister, who was one of the first people to re-enter the city and help the injured after the bomb blast; Antonio Ciocco, head of statistical studies for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which studies the long term effects of radiation upon man; Dr. Fumio Shigeto, director of Hiroshima's Red Cross Hospital, who personally supervises the care and treatment of the still suffering bomb victims; Barbara Reynolds, founder of Hiroshima's Friendship Center, who has long been active in the World Peace Movement; Marvin Tack, an American social worker in Hiroshima; Kasushige Hirasawa, editor of Japan Times; Jun Eto, a leading Japanese literary critic. Running Time: 58:59 (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
The special report, filmed by N.E.T. entirely in Japan, examines the people and the city which were the victims of the world's first nuclear explosion to mark the twentieth anniversary of the event (August 6, 1965). Through interviews with survivors, scientist, government officials, Americans in Hiroshima, and journalists, the on location documentary recalls the horror and tragedy of the nuclear explosion and also assesses the bomb's political and psychological implications, the physical effects still being felt by its victims, the medical and scientific research being continued to aid them, national attacks toward the United States, and the A-bomb's influence on the growing Japanese trend toward pacifism. People featured on the program include Edwin Reischauer, U.S. Ambassador to Japan; Antonio Ciocco, head of statistical studies, Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission; Dr. Fumio Shigeto, director of Hiroshima's Red Cross Hospital; Barbara Reynolds, founder of Hiroshima's Friendship Center, and a longtime activist in the World Peace Movements; Kasushige Hirasawa, editor of Japan Times; Marvin Tack, an American social worker in Hiroshima. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
At Issue consists of 69 half-hour and hour-long episodes produced in 1963-1966 by NET, which were originally shot on videotape in black and white and color.
Broadcast
1965-08-00
Asset type
Episode
Genres
News
Documentary
Topics
News
War and Conflict
Media type
Moving Image
Duration
00:58:59
Embed Code
Copy and paste this HTML to include AAPB content on your blog or webpage.
Credits
Assistant Editor: Jackson, Bob
Associate Producer: Cunniff, Lois
Camera Operator: Waku
Director: Stern, Andrew A.
Editor: Goldsmith, Charles
Executive Producer: Perlmutter, Alvin H.
Interviewee: Reynolds, Barbara
Interviewee: Reischauer, Edwin
Interviewee: Tack, Marvin
Interviewee: Shibama, Tazu
Interviewee: Numata, Rihei
Interviewee: Hirasawa, Kasushige
Interviewee: Tanimoto, William
Interviewee: Eto, Jun
Interviewee: Shigeto, Fumio
Interviewee: Ciocco, Antonio
Producer: Stern, Andrew A.
Producing Organization: National Educational Television and Radio Center
Writer: Cunniff, Lois
Writer: Stern, Andrew A.
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Thirteen - New York Public Media (WNET)
Identifier: wnet_aacip_31311 (unknown)
Format: Digital Betacam
Generation: Master
Duration: 00:58:59
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 1 inch videotape: SMPTE Type C
Generation: Master
Color: B&W
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-2 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: U-matic
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: B&W
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-4 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-5 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832759-6 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 2 inch videotape
Generation: Master
Color: B&W

Identifier: cpb-aacip-75-171vhrvn.mp4.mp4 (mediainfo)
Format: video/mp4
Generation: Proxy
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Citations
Chicago: “At Issue; 58; Hiroshima,” 1965-08-00, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed August 20, 2019, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_75-171vhrvn.
MLA: “At Issue; 58; Hiroshima.” 1965-08-00. Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. August 20, 2019. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_75-171vhrvn>.
APA: At Issue; 58; Hiroshima. Boston, MA: Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_75-171vhrvn