thumbnail of Intertel; 47; Report from Cuba
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Series
Intertel
Episode Number
47
Episode
Report from Cuba
Producing Organization
KQED-TV (Television station : San Francisco, Calif.)
Contributing Organization
Thirteen WNET (New York, New York)
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/75-15bcc427
NOLA Code
ITTL
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Description
Intertel is a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television. Intertel was conceived in November, 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produces on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding, he added. I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming.
NET's "Report from Cuba" is an hour long documentary filmed inside the revolutionary hub of the Western Hemisphere. Produced for National Educational Television by Richard Moore of KQED, San Francisco the episode studies Castro's efforts to overcome his two personal dragons - underdevelopment and the spectra of "Yankee Imperialism." Castro's attempt to export his revolution is demonstrated at the July 26 Organization of Latin American Solidarity meeting, which celebrates the 14th anniversary of the attack on Fort Moncada, signaling the onset of the revolution. Castro, who took control of Cuba 5 years later, is seen addressing an enthusiastic throng of 100,000 at OLAS, which includes Negro militant Stokely Carmichael and a delegation from the National Liberation Front of Vietnam. At the OLAS meeting James Reston of the New York Times, also in Cuba at the time, notes that Castro has "hypnotized this island" and has "made a good beginning here in many, many ways ,AeP there is an enthusiasm ,AeP a revolution within a revolution with the women and particularly the young." Cuba's youth movement is shown in action at the Isle of Youth, a former prison now used for agricultural training, military drill, and other disciplines of the [,AeP] communist. "Report from Cuba" studies Cuba's agricultural reforms, continued rationing on the island, the decline of Havana as a Western capital, the role of the intellectual, the waves of emigration to the United States, the "rehabilitation" of political prisoners, an experimental community at San Andres, and the education of the Cuban child. The episode also contains footage from a festival at Santiago de Cuba and a prestigious international art exhibit, the Salon de Mai.
Intertel, a dramatic breakthrough in the dissemination of ideas and cultural exchange through television, was conceived in November 1960. Five television broadcasters in the four major English-speaking nations joined to form the International Television Federation, to be known as Intertel, the first such international organization. The participants were Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. of Great Britain, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and for the United States, the National Educational Television and Radio Center and the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. Intertel produced on a bi-monthly basis hour-long documentaries on important world topics, inaugurating a global television production agency dedicated to the creation of programs of substance and meaning. John F. White, President of NET, called Intertel "more than a fusion of the creative talents of the organizations involved in producing television programs of outstanding merit. It is a step forward to world understanding," he added. "I believe that the exchange of documentaries, while of great significance in the vastness of the mutual understanding in it can foster, is but the first step in a regular exchange of all forms of programming." Donald H. McGannon, President of WBC, hailed the new organization as "a pool of the technical and creative ability and knowledge of all the groups which will extend the international horizons of television in all aspects. This is the first practical step, after years of talking and hoping, toward the creation and use of international television for cultural exchange and an effective weapon for peace." By having observers examine topics far removed from their everyday assignments, Intertel gives viewers a fresh viewpoint. The founder members indicated that by dubbing these programs in foreign languages and making them available to all nations, they hoped television companies in Europe, Asia and South America will eventually join this unique project. The supervisory committee for the United States programming segments consists of Mr. McGannon and Mr. White; Richard M. Pack, WBC Vice President - Programming; and Robert Hudson, NET Vice President for Programming. Intertel came into formal being November 14, 1960, in a special meeting in Vancouver, B.C., and the culmination of plans for such an association which has been under way for a long time. John McMilliam of Associate Rediffusion, was named contemporary Coordinating Officer at that time. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Broadcast
1967-10-30
Asset type
Episode
Genres
Documentary
Topics
Global Affairs
Public Affairs
Media type
Moving Image
Credits
Interviewee: Lockwood, Lee
Interviewee: Desnoes, Edmundo
Interviewee: Rodriguez, Carlos Rafael
Producer: Moore, Richard
Producing Organization: KQED-TV (Television station : San Francisco, Calif.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Thirteen - New York Public Media (WNET)
Identifier: wnet_aacip_2312 (WNET Archive)
Format: 16mm film
Duration: 00:56:59?
Library of Congress
Identifier: 2004998-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: B&W
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Identifier: [request film based on title] (Indiana University)
Format: 16mm film
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Citations
Chicago: “Intertel; 47; Report from Cuba,” 1967-10-30, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed August 9, 2020, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-15bcc427.
MLA: “Intertel; 47; Report from Cuba.” 1967-10-30. Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. August 9, 2020. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-15bcc427>.
APA: Intertel; 47; Report from Cuba. Boston, MA: Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-75-15bcc427