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morning this lingers along with arianna candidate launches who read it out into the ocean with a few people and no buildings in sight it's easy to imagine she's looking back and kind of a handful of kayakers in the distance could lead to marriage indians had in traditional the twenty four year old had a vision works for the sierra club which wants to save this post from development needs to market a line in the sand and say the turnaround with the developments made repeated proven continuing to gobble candidate spots a trio of bottlenose dolphins surfacing just a few yards from the boat she says diversity is especially rich on the gambia to compose that's because on land and in water is where the state's southern and northern speeches over the border in addition to
forty four indians are vertebrates candidate says there are also many archaeological sites and places that are sacred to the native to mesh indians one of the ways to protect the area would be to make it a national seashore the national park service is currently studying the idea and how to do it options include acquiring land from property owners or helping them preserve it as open space but while a national park has supporters in urban south santa barbara county it has infuriated landowners here along the gambia the coast many of them feel marginalized when urban dwellers push for environmental regulations that affect their rural and more conservative north east county a few miles up the coast in the mountains behind refute hero state each jennifer mcnatt checks on her half dozen arabian horses big man's property is near the reagan ranch the iranians used to be champion show or ces but i think that they're
now and then moved here from the la area in the nineteen seventies and she hopes to spend the rest of her life here but she fears that won't happen there's two hundred and twenty five million acres i believe owned or managed by the national park service which only about four million is privately owned that that's not going to believe that you get to stay the national park service says it wouldn't force and you want to sell and it wouldn't have any control over private land within a national seashore boundary but macnab years having the park service as a neighbor would expose her to liability for some of the park's activities she also says she doesn't see a need for a national park because current zoning laws restrict development outside of urban santa barbara so many lives are predominantly driven by the community at large and looking at the community at large in santa barbara is violently opposed to major
development but environmentalists say santa barbara's urban growth boundary has already been expanded to accommodate a luxury resort and spa and santa barbara county is expected to grow by more than twenty percent in the next thirty years congresswoman lois capps says that's one reason county supervisors asked her to write the legislation that commissioned the park service study even do we have voting laws they are not permanent and there our land tried but they're limited very small and the federal government debt offer the opportunity for larger the idea cap says isn't to make the coast another yosemite but rather to explore a number of options they could keep it as it is today and then eons helping local farmers and ranchers stay in business on an expansive rolling hills that straddles highway one near lompoc we meet jose bear his house lounge of any large oak trees preaching their tails and flicking their ears
like many landowners here there's family has owned this ranch for generations and that's lucky he says because it would be impossible to buy and sustain a ranch here today cost of the land the speculative value of land so high relative to the agricultural that the agricultural income just cannot pay the mortgage there are worries that heirs of today's landowners will sell to developers conservation groups or affluent people not interested in farming that he doesn't support a national park among other things he fears that it would attract bus loads of people who were trampled the ecosystems there says he prefers options that don't involve the government things like open space he's nuts wary public may purchase the new state that would prevent house is being built for the rancher maintains the agricultural rights to the land there is says a few landowners along the coast have already done this they've sold their development rights to a local land trust
arianna can engage heads into short she says one of the options of the park service is studying is the possibility of buying weapons placed the easement instead of the national park service itself apart in terms of recognizing this major financial resources providing subsidies for farmers i think any candidate says the park service can keep gabby and it goes from being overrun by limiting the number of heart facilities and services she pulls her vote on to the beach several men are phishing and a handful of kids are digging in the sand the beaches beginning to fill with people hind candidate the group of kayakers also tether on as they praise the national park service
This record is featured in “Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting.”
Segment
Gaviota Coast Protection Efforts
Producing Organization
KPCC-FM (Radio station : Pasadena, Calif.)
Contributing Organization
KPCC (Pasadena, California)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/511-rj48p5w613
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Description
Many Santa Barbara County residents worry that LA-style sprawl will devour the last large stretch of the southern California Coast. To protect open space along the seventy miles of coastline from Goleta to the northern tip of Vandenberg Air Force Base, some want the area to win national park status. But as KPCC's Ilsa Setziol reports, local landowners are vehemently opposed to the idea.
Broadcast
2002-09-16
Asset type
Segment
Genres
News Report
Topics
Environment
News
Nature
Subjects
urban sprawl; open space
Rights
The copyright to this work is owned by KPCC. Inquiries regarding further use should be directed to KPCC.
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:07:10
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Credits
Copyright Holder: KPCC
Producer: Setziol, Ilsa
Producing Organization: KPCC-FM (Radio station : Pasadena, Calif.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
KPCC
Identifier: GaviotaCoast091602-2 (unknown)
Format: audio/wav
Generation: Master
Duration: 00:07:09
KPCC
Identifier: GaviotaCoast091602-1 (unknown)
Format: MiniDisc
Generation: Original
Duration: 00:07:09
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Citations
Chicago: “Gaviota Coast Protection Efforts,” 2002-09-16, KPCC, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 20, 2019, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_511-rj48p5w613.
MLA: “Gaviota Coast Protection Efforts.” 2002-09-16. KPCC, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 20, 2019. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_511-rj48p5w613>.
APA: Gaviota Coast Protection Efforts. Boston, MA: KPCC, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_511-rj48p5w613