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Music now. Lore. Music written to be played down to be heard now. Music of our own day created by composers of our time to express and interpret the life of the mid 20th century music now is produced and recorded by the broadcasting services of the University of Alabama on drug grant from the National Educational Television and Radio Center and cooperation with the National Association of educational broadcasters. This is the fourth in a series of nine programs demonstrating the accomplishments of the American composer at mid-century. The music you are hearing in this series is the work of 16 composers resident in six southeastern states. It is music varied in style and content. Music expressive of American culture of the present day the music of America is the Voice of America. And this series of programs you are hearing that
voice as it speaks with confidence and self-assurance. It is the voice of a culture that has matured. And this fourth program you will hear two very different quartets. The first of these is two movements from the string quartet by Newton Strandberg. Mr. Strandberg has been a student of the American composers Henry Cowell and Norman Lockwood and I'm not here but I say he is currently professor of music at Howard College in Birmingham Alabama. The two movements of the Stromberg quartet are marked motor opto Vivaah G and adagio espress Evo. They have motor out of the Avanti as music of generally reserved character though it is disturbed by occasional bursts of intensity. The movement is marked by alternations of quiet contemplation and aggressive action. The texture was contrapuntal with considerable independence of the parks. It is noteworthy that the composer has managed to maintain an impression of lightness and clarity never allowing the music to become target despite the freedom of the four voices. The
music reveals continually Strandberg insight into the handling of the string quartet medium and his ability to create interesting and musically valid effects. The listener's attention is held up throughout the movement with no loss of momentum and the adagio movement attention is focused after a quiet introduction upon a violin melody of extraordinary beauty and suggestiveness. This theme becomes the principal material of the movement although it soon gathers about itself a web of subsidiary thematic material. About midway through the movement a new chromatic motif of striking character is introduced. This soon generates the final climax which reaches heights of blazing intensity. The adagio concludes with a return to the deep contemplation of the opening especially arresting as a passage near the close of the movement of the instruments and turn to reiterate a tiny figure of shock puts a cut in my woods which seems to signal the complete disintegration of the musical thought. And after this the end comes quickly.
The harmonic style of the Strand bird quartet is thoroughly modern without sacrificing anything of express sympathy. It is a tonal style but free in modulation and chord formation. Above all it is individual and he speaks conviction. Let us hear now the motor auto Vivace and adagio movements from nuking Strandberg string quartet performing the work is the Atlanta Symphony string quartet.
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Well. I. But. You. Know. A. The work you have just heard was two movements from the string quartet by Newton Strandberg. It was performed by the Atlanta Symphony string quartet Martin saucily first violin William HUTCHENS second violin John Adams Viola and Donovan Schumacher cello. Turning now to the remaining work on this
program we will hear the Quartet for piano and whens by Theodore Snyder. Mr. Snyder is a native of New York and has studied with Benson persecutee and William Burges mock. He now teaches at the Hampton Institute in Virginia. The Snyder quartet is in three movements andante Allegro andante and the concluding Allegro throughout the work the emphasis is upon bright clear sonorities and clean diatonic harmonies. At times the music is reminiscent of the neo classic Stravinsky but it always maintains a distinctive profile of its own. The first movement is prefaced by a short introduction and moderate temple on the Allegro portion itself is gentle in its movement. The four instruments are involved in a conversation in which each retains its own essential character but all unite devolve a pleasant and harmonious whole. The slow movement in particular displays a fine and sensitive lyric gift coupled with the skilful use of crystal in counterpoint. The finale is
sardonic and witty with many unexpected turns of phrase and this movement the piano provides the percussive background for the contrapuntal interplay of the wind instruments. This night or quartet illustrates the extent to which it is possible to accomplish significant ends through simple means its texture is a continual delight in its clarity and sharp bright sonorities while a definite but on a pretty rhythmic pulse drives the music continually forward. It is chamber music in the best sense. We hear now the Quartet for piano and whens by Theodore Snyder. The performances by Julia Morgan piano James Gunn oboe. Patrick Pearse Well flute and Lawrence Morgan clarinet.
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You have just heard the Quartet for piano and whens by Theodore Snyder. It was performed by Julia Morgan piano James Gunn oboe Patrick Pearse Well flute and Lawrence Morgan clarinet. Also heard on this program were two movements from the string quartet by Newton Strandberg. But the performance of the Snyder quartet we conclude the fourth in a series of nine programs designed to bring you Representative American music of the present day. All of the music in this series is the work of members of the Southeastern composers League an organization of composers of the southeastern states for the past seven years the Southeastern composers league has fostered and encouraged interest in American music throughout the southern United States. The work you are hearing all the music now all were performed at the 10th Annual composers forum of the University of Alabama. The composers forum is a joint production of the University of Alabama and the Southeastern
composers lead. Music now is presented by the music department of the University of Alabama. This series is written by JF goes on coordinated by David Cohen and produced by David Marx or your commentator has been jam all day. Music now was produced and recorded by the broadcasting services of the University of Alabama under a grant from the Eifel Educational Television and Radio Center and is being distributed by the National Association of educational broadcasters. This is the in the Radio Network.
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Series
Music now
Episode
Newton Strandberg and Theodore Snyder
Producing Organization
University of Alabama
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-2805264v
If you have more information about this item than what is given here, or if you have concerns about this record, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-2805264v).
Description
Episode Description
The fourth episode of this series focuses on the music of Newton Strandberg and Theodore Snyder.
Other Description
A series focused on American composers of the mid-Twentieth century.
Topics
Music
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:29:46
Credits
Composer: Strandberg, Newton
Executive Producer: Cohen, David
Producer: Marxer, David
Producing Organization: University of Alabama
Speaker: Allday, Jim
AAPB Contributor Holdings
University of Maryland
Identifier: 5474 (University of Maryland)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Duration: 01:00:00?
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Citations
Chicago: “Music now; Newton Strandberg and Theodore Snyder ,” University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed May 18, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-2805264v.
MLA: “Music now; Newton Strandberg and Theodore Snyder .” University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. May 18, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-2805264v>.
APA: Music now; Newton Strandberg and Theodore Snyder . Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-500-2805264v