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The old between seventeen hundred seventy seven thousand nine hundred seventy six. This country went through some changes unparalleled in the history of America. I say you youngsters have been a merk of America's not very careful between nineteen hundred seventy and nine thousand nine hundred seventy six. Mother just might go to some o s. A s with you young says a sayin to emerge to day the same as you said a year ago tomorrow at this very camp was you was saying to America you sick mama. And all the old slimy degenerate priest kept sayin you too young you got a doctor on you know America stick it well. It. Goes way back. They left a medical record for mother and in the medical record
they wrote it so clear and so plain you don't need no medical background to look at Mother's health chart that medical records called the United States Constitution. And when you read the Constitution it tells you what most of America supposed to act like think like talk life walk like and like. When she's helping inform reading the Constitution and looking at most of America. She had been sick for a law with the OAS. Young folks get America to take the examination in going for the cute. Young folks to get America to take the examination in going for the
cue. When we get America to take the examination in going for the Q. A new America was all about the queue. A new America was. Young folks to get America to take the examination in going for the. Anangu. Ruan. RUTH. Grant. Maybe 70 students were killed at
Jackson State College in Jackson Mississippi. Thank. You. Thank you thank you thank. Us. Thank you. Thank you. Thank. YOU THANK YOU.
Thank God. Because. I want. To thank you I don't have. To wait. I. Want to. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you want to thank. But but thank you. Why thank you. Because after that he has
become a political who I want to thank you. I would like to thank you. Thank you. Thank you. What about I want to thank you. I want to thank you. I want to write one to thank you. Why thank you. But it was for you. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK GOD
THANK YOU THANK YOU. Thanks. But. I'm going to. Get on a one. Way to. Do what to. Do with my family I would like. To do what. I want.
Why because I was. About to get off. My. My. Job I guess. Why would you want to. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you Robin. I.
Bought a copy I brought it. Back you know where I can thank GOD OH MY GOD. I'm like wow wow. Wow. Thank you thank you so much. Rami Khouri used to work right down the street from Jackson State for a month in January of 69 and one thing that impressed me very strongly about the state of affairs in Jackson Mississippi is that there is virtually no flow of people into it. That is to say people will come from Jackson to the north or they will come from Jackson. Elsewhere but. People are not going to that part of Mississippi at least it's definitely an outflow. Consequently it's very very a depressed area natural. You know it's just it's you know
very cheap place to live. Oh you poor thing. All right. I. Want to. Thank you. All you want. To thank you. I have a plaque. And I. Have a. Lot. Of. People A.
Lot. Of hype. I got what. I. Got. What I want to. Do. I get. Like I. Can.
Talk to her when. I had to go out. Thank. God. For today. Thank you God. When I. Was going to have a much better. I. Want. To. Talk Ira. OK. All. Right. And I. Thought I. Was. Going to have. The.
Opportunity. To have of. Course. It really struck me for one thing because I was just in Jackson a week ago at oh a women's conference. And during the time we were there in a camp near Jackson everyone kept saying you know not to leave because it you know never could tell what people would do around there and I remember feeling feeling awful. I think I'm feeling confronted with my own racism my own fear of being in the midst of a lot of black people who might hate me or you know who who are angry angry at women getting together in the south and the same thing struck me when I heard about the death. I felt my immediate reaction was we. Are more gifted and scale you know car that same. Awareness of my own distance from black people being my own shaman at that.
Moment I thought about all the more it sunk in frustration sorrow. You know like I feel you know like physically I can't help but. I try to make my so I can say forget about it because I can't forget about it. I try to condition myself. I try to make myself. Like. As much as like. Two. Things like this used to affect me because. I do feel very powerless because I realize that there isn't. Really anything I can do. To. Bring them back to life or bring all the other people who've never done a humbug. Like that. To
my. Like it's more of an indication to me. Of like. Several greater problems. Such as this. This whole country. And the way. I would oppress its people. And. It indicates to me something. Even more that. Could be. A lot sadder. And that's the fact that people have become. So. Apathetic. It's an indication also of. More things to come. And even more types of overt oppression. Oh. Come on. What if I could thank. You.
THANK YOU THANK GOD WHY DID. They want to thank you. Now what. To do what. Do you want to be. Why do I want to think they were going to write you that they could but I want to. Thank. God that both thank you for what you will be what I want to
be and when I want to write a. Thank thank you I'd. Like to. THANK YOU THANK YOU to thank you. Thank you. Because. I want to thank you but I. Want to thank you for
what. You want to buy. Thank you my. God thank. God. What.
Why.
Title
Program about the Jackson State Killings, Jackson, Mississippi
Contributing Organization
WYSO (Yellow Springs, Ohio)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/27-k93125qt2b
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Description
Description
This program discusses the events that occurred at Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi on May 14 and 15, 1970. A group of Jackson State College students were protesting the May 4th shooting at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio where four students were killed by the Ohio National Guard during a demonstration against the Vietnam War. During the Jackson State College protest, the police ordered the students to disperse and started firing shots into the crowd. Phillip Lafayette Gibbs, a junior, and James Earl Green, a student at Jim Hill High School, were killed and twelve others injured by Jackson city police and Mississippi state troopers. On June 13, 1970, President Richard Nixon formed the President's Commission on Campus Unrest to investigate the incident. The Commission investigated the incident and gathered witness testimony. However, no one was arrested or convicted in connection with the deaths.
Asset type
Program
Genres
Documentary
Subjects
Demonstrations; Mississippi; Vietnam War
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:21:17
Embed Code
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Credits
Wardrobe: WYSO FM 91.3 Public Radio
AAPB Contributor Holdings
WYSO-FM (WYSO Public Radio)
Identifier: WYSO_PA_335 (WYSO FM 91.3 Public Radio; CONTENTdm Version 5.1.0; http://www.contentdm.com)
Format: Audio/wav
WYSO-FM (WYSO Public Radio)
Identifier: PA 335 (WYSO)
Format: 1/4 inch audio tape
Generation: Master
Duration: 0:21:16
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Citations
Chicago: “Program about the Jackson State Killings, Jackson, Mississippi,” WYSO, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed July 21, 2024, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-27-k93125qt2b.
MLA: “Program about the Jackson State Killings, Jackson, Mississippi.” WYSO, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. July 21, 2024. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-27-k93125qt2b>.
APA: Program about the Jackson State Killings, Jackson, Mississippi. Boston, MA: WYSO, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-27-k93125qt2b