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Series
The Computer and the Mind of Man
Episode Number
3
Episode
Univeral Machines
Producing Organization
KQED-TV (Television station : San Francisco, Calif.)
National Educational Television and Radio Center
National Educational Television and Radio Center
Contributing Organization
KQED (San Francisco, California)
Thirteen WNET (New York, New York)
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/55-300zq6hs
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Description
Episode Description
The computer can be called a "universal machine" in that it is capable of doing whatever man is capable of instructing it to do. Dr. C.R. DeCarlo, director of education for IBM, comments on the fact that the computer revolution represents a fundamentally different kind of advance because, unlike the industrial advances, the computer manipulates and processes information at incredible speeds. Of course, the answers and decisions that man gets from a computer depend entirely upon the data and instruction put into the machine. Computer scientists call this principle, GI-GO - garbage-in, garbage-out. Man-machine communications become difficult because man must communicate the complicated real world to a primitive machine. The principle problem today is deciding upon a universal "machine language" - that is, agreeing upon a single set of symbols and abstractions to define problems. At present, there are many programming languages - for instance, Fortran, Flow-matic, and Algol - all of which aim at symbolic simplicity. In conclusion, a distinguished group of computer experts discusses the endless possibilities of future methods of using these mathematical machines. Program guests are Dr. Richard C. Hamming; Fred Gruenberger; Dr. Thomas Burton, director of engineering research at the Shell Development Corporation; J. Presper Eckert; Dr. Ernest Koenigsberg, director of Operations Research for the San Francisco branch of CEIR (Corporation for Economic and Industrial Research) and professor in the School of Industrial Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley; and Professor A.L. Samuel of IBM. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Series Description
In the 1940s a different kind of tool was invented a tool for extending certain powers of mans mind, the electronic computer. It is the fast, reliable, and tireless performance of a variety of arithmetic and logical operatic is which gives the computer its great utility and power. What this exciting invention means to mankind now and in the future is the subject of this provocative series. According to a series guest Dr. Richard Hamming, research mathematician at Bell Telephone Laboratories, The computer revolution is often compared with the famous industrial revolution in importance and scope. The industrial revolution effectively released man from being a beast of burden; the computer revolution will similarly release man from slavery to a dull, repetitive routine computers, because they enable us to ask new questions, will enable us to get entirely new answers because the questions are new, the answers are also new and very exciting Animation, art, film, and dramatic sequences highlight the series. Under a grant from the International Business Machines Corporation, The Computer and the Mind of man was produced by N.E.T. by KQED in San Francisco. The 6 half-hour episodes that comprise this series were originally records on film. (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Created Date
1962-00-00
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Education
Technology
Media type
Moving Image
Credits
Animator: Ensrud, E. Wayne
Animator: Ensrud, E. Wayne
Associate Producer: Langee, Harvey
Associate Producer: Langee, Harvey
Composer: Subotnick, Morton
Composer: Subotnick, Morton
Director: Moore, Richard
Director: Moore, Richard
Editor: Saraf, Irving
Editor: Saraf, Irving
Guest: Eckert, J. Presper
Guest: Gruenberger, Fred
Guest: Hamming, Richard C.
Guest: Burton, Thomas
Guest: Samuel, A. L.
Guest: DeCarlo, C. R.
Guest: Koenigsberg, Ernest
Guest: Eckert, J. Presper
Guest: Gruenberger, Fred
Guest: Hamming, Richard C.
Producer: Moore, Richard
Producer: Moore, Richard
Producing Organization: KQED-TV (Television station : San Francisco, Calif.)
Producing Organization: National Educational Television and Radio Center
Producing Organization: National Educational Television and Radio Center
Production Manager: Katz, Robert
Production Manager: Katz, Robert
Release Agent: KQED
Writer: Moore, Richard
Writer: Moore, Richard
AAPB Contributor Holdings
KQED
Identifier: KQ75_20277;20277 (KQED AAP)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy
Duration: 00:30:00?
KQED
Identifier: KQ74_20276;20276 (KQED AAP)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy
Duration: 00:30:00?
Thirteen - New York Public Media (WNET)
Identifier: wnet_aacip_1923 (WNET Archive)
Format: 16mm film
Duration: 00:28:55?
Library of Congress
Identifier: 2405100-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 16mm film
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: B&W
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Identifier: [request film based on title] (Indiana University)
Format: 16mm film
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Citations
Chicago: “The Computer and the Mind of Man; 3; Univeral Machines,” 1962-00-00, KQED, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed April 21, 2024, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-55-300zq6hs.
MLA: “The Computer and the Mind of Man; 3; Univeral Machines.” 1962-00-00. KQED, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. April 21, 2024. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-55-300zq6hs>.
APA: The Computer and the Mind of Man; 3; Univeral Machines. Boston, MA: KQED, Thirteen WNET, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-55-300zq6hs