Series
Black Journal
Episode Number
61
Episode
The Black Cop. Part 1
Producing Organization
WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)
Contributing Organization
Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/512-vq2s46j64c
NOLA Code
BLJL
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Description
Episode Description
Four black policemen discuss their role in the current black struggle for freedom in this two-part episode. They are Sgt. Howard Sheffey, president of the Guardians of New York and chairman of the board of directors of the National Council of Police Society; Patrolman Renault Robinson, executive director of the Afro-American Patrolmans League in Chicago; Sgt. Harvey Adams, president of the Guardians of Greater Pittsburgh and president of the National Black Caucus on Police Community Relations; and New York Patrolman Leonard 12X (Weir), president of the National Society of Afro-American Policeman. The black cop has traditionally walked the beat of conflict. Where does his first allegiance liewith his people or with the establishment? How can he reconcile the fact that he is part of what many consider to be an oppressive system? And can he use his role to work for the dignity, pride and freedom of his people? These are the questions that the four participants deal with during the course of this Black Journal program. Their answers provide insight into the new breed of black cops who are organizing their efforts for the freedom struggle, the problems they encounter in establishing credibility with the black community, and the obstacles presented by the white-controlled police forces and the court system. The discussion also brings crime and corruption in America into sharper focus. Each one of the organizations, represented by these four men, attempts to effect change in different ways. The Guardians of Pittsburgh, according to Sgt. Adams, strive to educate the black community about their human and civil rights. Sgt. Adams feels that the law from Justice Mitchell to J. Edgar Hoover and his group of handpicked prima donnas has traditionally contrived to deny blacks their rights. The Society for Afro-American Policemen in New York seeks to promote fraternity among people of African descent, while the Chicago organization acts on improving relationships between black police and white police and between the police department and the black community. And the Guardians of New York are involved in informing the community about inadequate police practices and gaining control over the way police patrol black neighborhoods. As one participant points out, Right now blacks dont control any major police departments and do not have any black police officers in command functions. Since blacks do not affect major police policy change in this country, their efforts are channeled into the black community. However, according to the four panelists, there are many problems in this area: Some black cops are used against their own people as infiltrators into such organizations as the 5 per centers, the Panthers and CORE; there are not enough black officers to cover the beats in black neighborhoods; black officers who try to deal with police corruption in the black community are often transferred or demoted; white policemen who commit crimes against people are not often fired and white policemen do not treat black crime (when the victims and the perpetrators are black) with the same degree of efficiency as other crime. One innovation introduced into the black community by the Society of Afro-American Policemen is in the training of every black man, woman and child as civil police in their neighborhood. This serves the ultimate goal of all the black policemen organizations the unification of black people. Black Journal is a production of NET Division, Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Description adapted from documents in the NET Microfiche)
Series Description
Black Journal began as a monthly series produced for, about, and to a large extent by black Americans, which used the magazine format to report on relevant issues to black Americans. Starting with the October 5, 1071 broadcast, the show switched to a half-hour weekly format that focused on one issue per week, with a brief segment on black news called Grapevine. Beginning in 1973, the series changed back into a hour long show and experimented with various formats, including a call-in portion. From its initial broadcast on June 12, 1968 through November 7, 1972, Black Journal was produced under the National Educational Television name. Starting on November 14, 1972, the series was produced solely by WNET/13. Only the episodes produced under the NET name are included in the NET Collection. For the first part of Black Journal, episodes are numbered sequential spanning broadcast seasons. After the 1971-72 season, which ended with episode #68, the series started using season specific episode numbers, beginning with #301. The 1972-73 season spans #301 - 332, and then the 1973-74 season starts with #401. This new numbering pattern continues through the end of the series.
Broadcast Date
1972-05-09
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Race and Ethnicity
Media type
Moving Image
Credits
Executive Producer: Brown, Tony
Panelist: Robinson, Renault
Panelist: Weir, Leonard
Panelist: Sheffey, Howard
Panelist: Adams, Harvey
Producing Organization: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-2 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 1 inch videotape: SMPTE Type C
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-2 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 1 inch videotape: SMPTE Type C
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-2 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 1 inch videotape: SMPTE Type C
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 2 inch videotape
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 2 inch videotape
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-1 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: 2 inch videotape
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: U-matic
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: U-matic
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-3 (MAVIS Item ID)
Format: U-matic
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Duration: 0:29:07
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-5 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-5 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-5 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Copy: Access
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-4 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-4 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Color: Color
Library of Congress
Identifier: 1832295-4 (MAVIS Item ID)
Generation: Master
Color: Color
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Citations
Chicago: “Black Journal; 61; The Black Cop. Part 1,” 1972-05-09, Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed November 26, 2022, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-vq2s46j64c.
MLA: “Black Journal; 61; The Black Cop. Part 1.” 1972-05-09. Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. November 26, 2022. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-vq2s46j64c>.
APA: Black Journal; 61; The Black Cop. Part 1. Boston, MA: Library of Congress, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-512-vq2s46j64c