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You You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You You
You You
Series
From Socrates To Sartre
Episode Number
#15
Producing Organization
Maryland Public Television
Contributing Organization
Maryland Public Television (Owings Mills, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/394-33rv1d0v
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Description
Episode Description
#15: Hume IV: Self, God an Ethics. The Task of Refuting Hume - Reason: The Slave of the Passions Self, God, Ethics. Denial of idea of continuous identical self. Self only a "bundle or collection of different perceptions." Attack upon religion: The idea of God is not innate but the work of the imagination. Refutation of proof of God's existence by argument from design, as cause of the world. Refutation of Deism and belief in miracles. Morality: reason does not guide action. Reason is the slave of the passions. Good and bad, right and wrong have no source in reason or sense-impressions, but only in presumably universal sentiments of sympathy, fellow-feeling and self-interest. Denial of any moral laws. Virtue: whatever gives pleasing sentiment of approbation. Justice: reflects self-interest and public usefulness. Overview, criticism, influence. Rationalism vs. empiricism a no-win game. Empiricism pushed to radical extreme. "How do you know?" "What do you mean?" Destroy all beliefs which fail to meet these tests. The undermining of the Enlightenment belief in progress, based upon the truth of the laws of nature and human nature. Hume's mitigated skepticism; instinctive animal faith. Criticized for inconsistencies in his denial of existence of self and of the validity of causal laws; for his atomistic sensations; for the passivity of mind; for the narrowness of his empirical psychology. Influence greatest upon contemporary British "analytic" philosophy. Refuting Hume the task of all philosophers who followed him.
Topics
Education
Philosophy
Media type
Moving Image
Duration
00:29:31
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Credits
Copyright Holder: MPT
Host: Thelma Z. Lavine, Ph.D.
Producing Organization: Maryland Public Television
AAPB Contributor Holdings
Maryland Public Television
Identifier: 36583.0 (MPT)
Format: Digital Betacam
Generation: Master
Duration: 00:30:00?
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Citations
Chicago: “From Socrates To Sartre; #15,” Maryland Public Television, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 12, 2024, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-394-33rv1d0v.
MLA: “From Socrates To Sartre; #15.” Maryland Public Television, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 12, 2024. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-394-33rv1d0v>.
APA: From Socrates To Sartre; #15. Boston, MA: Maryland Public Television, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (GBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-394-33rv1d0v