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Giant owls once walked the earth. As recently as 10,000 years ago, these owls, now extinct, were among the largest of all known owls, standing 3½ feet tall and weighing 20 pounds. They thrived among the top predators on the island of Cuba.
But the wings of the Cuban Giant Owl were surprisingly small. They may have powered the bird up to low perches, but scientists think it hunted primarily on foot. Running on long, powerful legs equipped with large talons, the bird ambushed or chased down its prey.
The owls appear to have evolved their remarkable size and ground-dwelling habits at a time when Cuba had no large carnivorous mammals to compete with. Very little is known about why they died out.
Fossils of similar owls—with long legs and small wings—have been unearthed in places as disparate as Hawaii and Georgia, pointing to large terrestrial owls as a widespread, successful adaptation.
But from any angle, the Cuban Giant Owl was a behemoth among owls, an example of evolution pushed to the extreme.
For BirdNote, I’m Michael Stein.
Title
BirdNote
Title
Giant Owls of Cuba
Producing Organization
BirdNote
Contributing Organization
BirdNote (Seattle, Washington)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip-328f88ce4fb
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Description
The Cuban Giant Owl, now extinct, was 3_ feet tall and weighed 20 pounds — the largest of all known owls. It had very small wings, running after its prey on long, powerful legs. Similar large owls, with long legs and small wings, have been unearthed in places as disparate as Georgia and Hawaii. Very little is known about why giant owls died out.
Broadcast
2019-06-22
Asset type
Episode
Topics
Science
Subjects
Birds
Rights
Sounds were provided by the Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Xeno-Canto, Martyn Stewart, Chris Peterson, John Kessler, and others. Where music was used, fair use was taken into consideration. Individual credits are found at the bottom of each transcript.
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:01:45.195
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Credits
Copyright Holder: BirdNote
Producing Organization: BirdNote
Writer: Sundstrom, Bob
AAPB Contributor Holdings
BirdNote
Identifier: cpb-aacip-18b28e56c7e (Filename)
Format: Hard Drive
Generation: Master: preservation
Duration: 00:01:45
BirdNote
Identifier: cpb-aacip-18772ffab1d (unknown)
Generation: Proxy
Duration: 00:01:45.195
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Citations
Chicago: “BirdNote; Giant Owls of Cuba,” 2019-06-22, BirdNote, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed August 9, 2020, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-328f88ce4fb.
MLA: “BirdNote; Giant Owls of Cuba.” 2019-06-22. BirdNote, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. August 9, 2020. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-328f88ce4fb>.
APA: BirdNote; Giant Owls of Cuba. Boston, MA: BirdNote, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip-328f88ce4fb