Search the AAPB

If you have more information about this item than what is given here, we want to know! Contact us, indicating the AAPB ID (cpb-aacip/500-z60c1503).
Program
Back to School in Birmingham; Birmingham: Testament of Nonviolence, Part 4 [2 of 2]
Contributing Organization
University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland)
AAPB ID
cpb-aacip/500-z60c1503
National Association of Educational Broadcasters
63-Sp. 10-5
University of Maryland
1817
thumbnail of 
     Back to School in Birmingham; Birmingham: Testament of Nonviolence, Part 4
    [2 of 2]

This record is featured in “Voices from the Southern Civil Rights Movement.”

Description
A documentary recorded in Birmingham, Alabama, in May 1963, profiling students who were jailed for demonstrating during the recent 38-day direct action nonviolent integration campaign and were subsequently expelled or suspended from their schools. The Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), one of the leaders of the Birmingham movement, speaks to newly released students on strategy going forward. Bob Polk, minister to youth in New York, interviews students on their experiences in jail, their commitment to nonviolent protest, and their opinions on the controversial issue of whether children, some as young as six years old, should have been encouraged to join the demonstrations. On May 20, Birmingham Board of Education president Robert C. Arthur, announces that the 1,081 students who had been arrested would be expelled or suspended. That night, at St. Johns Church, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., president of SCLC, advises the students not to engage in further demonstrations until a new strategy has been devised. Constance Baker Motley, attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, tells the students that a suit will be filed the next day to stop the expulsion order and announces that the Supreme Court had ruled that day that students engaged in department store sit-ins must be released, a ruling, she says, that will effect more than 3,000 students. The next day, after the suit was filed, the U. S. Circuit Court in Atlanta ordered the reinstatement of all 1,081 Birmingham students who had been expelled. The series was produced by Riverside Radio, WRVR, the FM station of the Riverside Church, New York City, for the Educational Radio Network and the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. It was distributed by the National Association of Radio Broadcasters Network. New York Times critic Jack Gould called the series a first-class journalistic coup [that] constituted a remarkable social document for the ear. For information on the Birmingham movement, see Glenn T. Eskew, But for Birmingham: The Local and National Movements in the Civil Rights Struggle (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997).
Broadcast
1963-06-10
Created
1963-05-00
Genres
Documentary
Topics
Social Issues
Subjects
African Americans--Civil rights--History
Creator
WRVR, Producer
National Association of Educational Broadcasters, Production Unit
Contributor
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968, Speaker
Abernathy, Ralph, 1926-1990, Speaker
Nixon, Walter, Announcer
Summerfield, Jack, Announcer
Arthur, Robert C., Speaker
Motley, Constance Baker, Speaker
Polk, Bob, Interviewer
Media type
Sound
Duration
00:29:56
Embed Code
Copy and paste this HTML to include AAPB content on your blog or webpage.
Citation
Chicago: “ Back to School in Birmingham; Birmingham: Testament of Nonviolence, Part 4 [2 of 2] ,” 1963-06-10, University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC, accessed June 23, 2017, http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_500-z60c1503.
MLA: “ Back to School in Birmingham; Birmingham: Testament of Nonviolence, Part 4 [2 of 2] .” 1963-06-10. University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Web. June 23, 2017. <http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_500-z60c1503>.
APA: Back to School in Birmingham; Birmingham: Testament of Nonviolence, Part 4 [2 of 2] . Boston, MA: University of Maryland, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (WGBH and the Library of Congress), Boston, MA and Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_500-z60c1503